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Laura Amatulli
Laura Amatulli
(Rochester Hills - United States)

Teaching 8th grade in a middle school in suburban Detroit I have strong interests in Earth Science and leadership.  I  have been a teacher consultant for our local National Writing Project site, Meadow Brook Writing Project, which keeps me active  ...

Lesson 3 - Differentiating Between Different Types of Propaganda

3 - Lesson Plan on Propaganda

Group Size: Any

Time Required: 60 - 90 minutes

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to differentiate between different types of propaganda

Materials:

Student Worksheet #3 (attached)
Overhead transparency of definitions (attached)
Two overhead transparencies of images (attached) 
Post-it notes (so that students can code their novels)

Do Now: (Add a Do Now to the Student Notes so that students have something to complete upon entering the room. I like to use this opportunity to spiral skills from prior lessons or to ask students to journal about a life experience that might help them to make a connection with today's lesson.)

Connection: Well, I have news for you. Can you raise your hand if you're an only child? (Allow time.) Great. Thanks. Could all of you please get up and go sit in the library, away from the rest of us? (Allow time.  If your classroom is not equipped with a library, designate another area away from the rest of the class.)

Now, the rest of you with brothers and sisters... I'm here to inform you that this morning President Obama declared that all children who don't have brothers and sisters aren't actually American citizens. You didn't hear the news? He gave a really long, eloquent speech, the American flag waving in the background... (You will likely need to raise your voice over protests from the only children at this point.)  He said that it was un-American not to have siblings and any only-children were contaminating our otherwise pure, American society.

So... what we're going to do is we're going to deport all of the only-children to (Insert neighboring state). Really, no one much cares for (Insert neighboring state with an unappetizing description.). The plan is to move all of the only-children there, gate them off from the rest of the country and go on per usual.

Anyone have any issues with that? (Tease out issues. Encourage students to make connections between this preposterous situation and yesterday's reading.  Eventually reveal that this is a ruse.)

Direct Instruction / Guided Practice: As you've shown me, it isn't easy to convince a group of people to discriminate against others when they don't already hold some kind of prejudice. Nazis by definition believed that they were superior to other groups of people, so discrimination like this would have been an easier sell in Nazi Germany. But still, the Nazi-German government used special techniques to convince non-Nazis that the principles of the Nazi government were worth standing behind and to keep all Nazis in the fold.

Can anyone recall what those techniques are called? (Give clues if necessary. Target: Propaganda.)

And what is propaganda? (Accept reasonable responses.)

Propaganda is still alive and well today. Basically, when you turn on your TV or open your newspaper, or any time you encounter media of any kind, you're going to be exposed to propaganda. Let's define it together as "methods used to spread ideas that further a cause (a political, commercial, religious or civil cause)"  (T should reveal the definition on the overhead as students record it in their notes.)

Let's look at a couple of examples. The first one we'll check out today is called "Bandwagon." Does anyone remember how the "Bandwagon" technique works? (Accept reasonable responses.)

Check out this ad.  (Place Advertisement 1 on the overhead. Ask leading questions about the objective of the ad and the impact the ad has on students.)

Bandwagon propaganda works by trying to convince you that "everybody else is doing it," whatever "it" is. And if you don't do "it," you'll be left out.

Let's define "Bandwagon Propaganda" together. (T will reveal the definition on the overhead while S write it in their notes.) "Everyone else is doing it, so you should do it too. Otherwise, you'll be left out."

Let's check out one more. This technique is called "Repetition." Can anyone tell me why?

(Place Advertisement 2 on the overhead. Accept reasonable responses.)

Let's define "Repetition" together. (T will reveal the definition on the overhead while S record it in their notes.)  "A name, key word, phrase or image is used over and over again."

Take a moment to look at the other ads on your notes for today. Determine whether they're using the "Bandwagon" technique or the "Repetition" technique. You're welcome to work independently or with a partner.

(Allow time. Then share out whole-class and tease out students' thinking.)

Link: Just like yesterday, you should continue practicing coding your novels.  If, as you are reading your literature circle books, you find descriptions of propaganda, make sure to sticky note them so that you can share them with your literature circle members at your next meeting!

Independent Practice: (S read silently and code the text. Since all S should have selected literature circle novels and scheduled meetings with their literature circle groups for this week, small groups of S may be meeting at this time. T should be free to hold Reader's Workshop conferences with individual students and/or pull small groups for guided reading or other interventions.)

Share: Our reading time is up for today. Please take a couple of minutes to share your thinking and your coding with your table partner or your literature circle group.

(T will allow time.)

Closing:Today we began our discussion of propaganda, one of Nazi Germany's most important tools for getting German citizens to go along with their plan to "purify" the German "race." It's important that we take the time to become familiar with these kinds of persuasive techniques, as they're still in use today, sometimes for the purpose of selling products, sometimes for the purpose of shaping our opinions about religion and politics.

It's time for million dollar question!

1. Today we discussed the propaganda techniques of "Bandwagon" and "Repetition." How do they work? (Bandwagon makes you feel like you need to do something or you'll be left out. Repetition just repeats an idea, symbol, word, sound, etc. over and over again.)

2. How did World War II begin?  (Accept reasonable responses.)

3. (Note to the Instructor: Insert your own question here based upon objectives your students mastered up until this point in the year.)

4. What was World War II? Answer this question in a way that an eight-year-old could understand. (Accept reasonable responses.)

Differentiation: Novels are differentiated by reading level and by choice. Gradual release during Direct Instruction/Guided practice. Choice of working independently or with partners.  Active reading strategy: coding the text.

 

3 - Student Worksheet

This worksheet is for use with Lesson Three of the World War II and the Holocaust unit.

This resource is part of the World War II and the Holocaust Unit collection.

Open or Download This File:

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3 - Overhead Transparency of Definitions

This overhead transparency is for use with Lesson 3 of the World War II and the Holocaust unit.

This resource is part of the World War II and the Holocaust Unit collection.

Open or Download This File:

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3 - Overhead Transparency of Advertisement 1

This overhead transparency is for use with Lesson 3 of the World War II and the Holocaust unit.

This resource is part of the World War II and the Holocaust Unit collection.

Open or Download This File:

Download

3 - Overhead Transparency of Advertisement 2

This overhead transparency is for use with Lesson 3 of the World War II and the Holocaust unit.

This resource is part of the World War II and the Holocaust Unit collection.

Open or Download This File:

Download