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Emily Boyle
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Teaching Shakespeare: Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

A Shmoop study guide for William Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar. Includes overview and study questions.

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Julius Caesar Act III

Name: __________________________


 

Julius Caesar Act III Study Guide

Vocabulary

1.  valiant (adj)


 

2.  firmament (n)


 

3.  malice (n)


 

4.  apprehensive (adj)


 

5.  censure (v)


 

6.  interred (adj)


 

7.  legacy (n)


 

8.  orator (n)


 

9.  plebeians (n)


 

10.  beseech (v)


 

1.  In scene 1, there is still a chance that the conspiracy might be foiled.  Explain why Artemidorus fails to get Caesar to read his warning.


 


 


 

2.  What petition serves as an excuse for the conspirators to gather around Caesar immediately before the assassination?


 


 


 

3.  In scene 1, why does Cassius argue against allowing Antony to speak at Caesar’s funeral?


 


 


 

4.  In order to make a compromise, what rules does Brutus give Antony about what he can and cannot do in his speech at Caesar’s funeral?


 


 


 


 

5.  How does Antony’s speech at the end of scene 1 (lines 254-275) reveal his true feelings about the assassins?

6.  For a moment after the assassination, the action seeps to stop since the protagonists (the conspirators) have achieved their goal. However, a new protagonist appears who will drive the action for the rest of the play.  Who is he, and what is his goal?


 


 


 


 

7.  In scene 2, how does the crowd react to Brutus’ speech at the funeral?


 


 

8.  Antony’s funeral oration in Scene 2 is one of the most famous pieces of rhetoric in literature.  How is Antony able to follow the rules that Brutus gave him while still ruining the conspirators’ reputations? 


 


 


 


 

9.  What are four rhetorical devices that Antony repeatedly uses in his speech?


 


 


 

10.  What does Antony disclose to the crowd concerning Caesar’s will?  How does the crowd react?


 


 


 

11.  How has the crowd’s attitude changed from the beginning of scene 2 to the end?


 


 


 


 

12.  How were the mob’s madness and the murder of Cinna foreshadowed earlier in the play?


 


 


 

13.  How do you feel about Brutus in this act?  Is he still an admirable character or not?  Is he a victim or a villain?  Explain.


 


 


 


 


 


 

How do you feel about Antony in this act?  Has he surprised you in any way?  Be specific.

Analyzing Antony's Tone in Julius Caesar Act 3 Scene 1

This detailed venn diagram activity asks students to closely analyze the contrasting tones in Antony's two major speeches in Act 3 Scene of Julius Caesar.

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Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, e-Text in English. From Project Gutenberg as part of the collection of The 43 Most Frequently Taught Books in at Least 5% of Public Schools, Grades 7-12.

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Should Caesar Be Saved?

Introduction:
 

You have been transported back in time to March 44 B.C. to the Roman Republic.  A plot to assassinate Gaius Julius Caesar -- the great Roman statesman, rhetorician, and military hero -- is set to be carried out on March 15.  Standing among the senators and those conspiring against Caesar, you have the power to speak up.  Should Caesar be saved or should he be condemned to death?  It's your choice.
 

The Task:
 

After gathering as much information as you possibly can on Gaius Julius Caesar, you will compose and deliver a speech before your fellow senators (classmates) either in support or in opposition to Caesar.
 

The Process:
 

1.  Students will be divided into groups of 4.

2.  Each student will read about Caesar from the following resources:

www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/88114/Julius-Caesar

encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761578066/Julius_Caesar.html#461577345

www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Julius-Caesar#Life

www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Julius_Caesar.aspx

3.  The group of 4 students must choose a side: 2 students must support Caesar and 2 students must be against Caesar.

4.  Return to the articles and take notes on anything you might want to include in your speech.  Options include, but are not limited to:  family history, personal character/personality, positions held, military accomplishments, awards, and reforms.  The notes are to be organized either in a list, chart/table, or web diagram.  You may take notes individually or with the help of your partner.

5.  Using you notes and working with your partner, formally write your speech in support or in opposition to Caesar.

  • Your speech must have an introduction, body, and conclusion.
  • Introduction:  Clearly state your position/argument (either for or against Caesar).  Have a strong interest catcher.
  • Conclusion:  Have a strong conclusion that would make your audience remember your speech and want to support your argument.
  • Make sure there are no mistakes in spelling, grammar, or punctuation.
6.  Submit a written copy of your speech and the notes you took on the articles.

7.  Each pair of students will recite their speech in front of the class.

  • Gain and maintain the interest of your audience.
  • Incorporate a visual or prop into your speech.
Evaluation:
 

 BeginningDevelopingAccomplishedExemplary
Stated Objective or PerformanceDescription of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting a beginning level of performance.Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting development and movement toward mastery.Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting mastery.Description of identifiable performance characteristics reflecting the highest level of performance.
Stated Objective or Performance    
Stated Objective or Performance    
Stated Objective or Performance    

 

Conclusion:
 

By the end of the WebQuest, students will have a better understanding of who Julius Caesar was and the controversy that surrounded him.  They will read about Julius Caesar from four different sources, each which give their own impression about what Caesar was like as a person.  Students will be able to formulate their own opinions using facts to either support of be against Caesar.  Students will gain experience in written composition and oral speaking by delivering their speech to the class.
 

Credits & References:
 

Students used the following resouces to gather information about Julius Caesar:

"Julius Caesar." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2009. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 31 March 2009 http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/88114/Julius-Caesar]>.

Arnold Joseph Toynbeealso contributed to the article found on Encyclopaedia Britannica.  He is the Director of Studies, Royal Institute of International Affairs, London, 1925–55. Research Professor of International History, University of London, 1925–55. Author of A Study of History and many others.

"Julius Caesar," Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2008. http://encarta.msn.comencyclopedia_761578066_3/Julius_Caesar.html]> © 1997-2008 Microsoft Corporation.

This article is contributed by Michael S. Cheilik, M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of History, Lehman College of the City University of New York. Author of Ancient History: From Its Beginnings to the Fall of Rome.

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Julius-Caesar#References

"Julius Caesar." The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2008. Encyclopedia.com. 31 March. 2009 http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Julius_Caesar.aspx]>.
 

Standards:
 

PA.R.1.4STANDARD: Types of WritingPA.R.1.4.8.C> Write persuasive piecesPA.R.1.4.8.C.1>--- Include a clearly stated position or opinion.PA.R.1.4.8.C.2>--- Include convincing, elaborated and properly cited evidence.PA.R.1.4.8.C.3>--- Develop reader interest.PA.R.1.5STANDARD: Quality of WritingPA.R.1.5.8.B> Write using well-developed content appropriate for the topicPA.R.1.5.8.B.3>--- Write paragraphs that have details and information specific to the topic and relevant to the focusPA.R.1.5.8.C.1>--- Sustain a logical order within sentences and between paragraphs using meaningful transitions.PA.R.1.5.8.C.2>--- Establish topic and purpose in the introduction.


 

Required Attachments:
 

    tKeLydXjEDM300WebquestRubric.doc 

 

jc act1


 


 

Name:________________________________


 

Julius Caesar Study Guide: Act I

Vocabulary: Write down the definition for each of the following vocab words from Act I.


 

1.  barren (adj)

                                                                                   

2.  blunt (adj)

                                                                                   

3.  conspirator (n)

                                                                       

4.  countenance (n)

                                   

5.  encompass (v)


 

6.  infirmity (n)


 

7.  portentous (adj)


 

8.  servile (adj)


 

9.  soothsayer (n)


 

10.  torrent (n)


 


 

Directions: Answer each of the following questions based on your reading of Act I.


 

1. Explain why the working men are celebrating in the first scene.  Why does Marullus reproach them?


 


 


 


 

2. What is the setting of Scene 2?  What warning does the soothsayer give Caesar, and what is Caesar’s response?


 


 


 


 

3. Explain what Cassius want to convince Brutus of in Scene 2?


 


 


 

4. Why does Caesar, in Scene 2, think Cassius is dangerous?  What qualities disturb him?


 


 


 


 


 

5. Describe what happens when Caesar is offered the crown, according to Casca?


 


 


 


 


 


 

6. Caesar stands astride the world as a powerful ruler, yet he suffers many personal weaknesses. Various characters will us what these are, and they say that a man who is as human as anyone else would not act life a god and rule the world.  What exactly are Caesar’s infirmities and weaknesses?


 


 


 

7. At the end of Scene 2, how does Cassius say he will pursue his plan to involve Brutus in the conspiracy against Caesar?


 


 


 

8. Believing that nature mirrors the disorders in human lives, Shakespeare heightens the atmosphere of terror as the conspirators gather to discuss their plans.  What details in Scene 3 do you think evoke this sense of danger and terror?


 


 


 


 

9. Who is the moving force, the protagonist, who drives the action, in Act I?  By the act’s end, what steps has he taken to achieve his goal?


 


 


 


 

10. How would you describe the play’s conflict as it is established in Act I?


 


 


 


 


 

11. Shakespeare uses even minor conflicts and events to set up the basic situation of the play and to foreshadow future conflicts and events.  Explain what you learn from this act about the moods and loyalties for the Roman mob.  


 


 


 


 

12. A healthy republic requires a reasonably intelligent and responsive citizenry.  Throughout this play people of Rome are described as “trash” or worse.  Point out passages in Act I where various nobles express their contempt for the common people.  How does this make you feel about these characters? Do the people seem to deserve a republic?


 


 


 


 


 

13. Cassius tell Brutus several anecdotes about Caesar in Scene 2.  What is Cassius implying through these stories? 


 


 


 


 


 

14.  Do you have any conflicting feeling about Caesar during this act?  Describe your impressions of his character, based on what you observe of his speeches and actins and on what other characters say about him.

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

Included Works:

ALLS WELL THAT ENDS WELL

AS YOU LIKE IT

THE TRAGEDY OF CORIOLANUS

CYMBELINE

THE TRAGEDY OF HAMLET, PRINCE OF DENMARK

THE FIRST PART OF KING HENRY THE FOURTH

SECOND PART OF KING HENRY IV

THE LIFE OF KING HENRY THE FIFTH

THE FIRST PART OF HENRY THE SIXTH

THE SECOND PART OF KING HENRY THE SIXTH

THE THIRD PART OF KING HENRY THE SIXTH

KING HENRY THE EIGHTH

KING JOHN

THE TRAGEDY OF JULIUS CAESAR

THE TRAGEDY OF KING LEAR

LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST

THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH

MEASURE FOR MEASURE

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE

THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM

THE TRAGEDY OF OTHELLO, MOOR OF VENICE

KING RICHARD THE SECOND

KING RICHARD III

THE TRAGEDY OF ROMEO AND JULIET

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

THE TEMPEST

THE LIFE OF TIMON OF ATHENS

THE HISTORY OF TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA

THE WINTER'S TALE

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Folger Shakespeare Library Lesson Plans

 

Collection of full course lesson plans for many of Shakespeare's works.

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Betsyanne.com Julius Caesar Curriculum Unit

 

Curriculum unit teaching Julius Caesar from Betsyanne.com (http://www.betsyanne.com)

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The Tragedy of Julius Caesar Lesson Plan

The Tragedy of Julius Caesar Lesson Plan teaching student fluency and expression in oral reading. Taken from http://www.teachercreatedmaterials.com.

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