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OERs

Using and Sharing OERs

Using and Sharing Open Educational Resources

 




Original image cc:attribution http://www.flickr.com/photos/danardvincente/


Introduction

This unit explores open educational resources and the critical role of this educational technology as one tool in the transformation of education. This module is designed as an introduction to composing, adapting, and designing your own Open Educational Resources (OERs), with a special emphasis on the using and sharing of OERs. Using information contained in the Open Educational Resources Handbook, this lesson will help students consider aspects of instructional design in order to create their own OER for sharing with others. Students will work to apply the concepts presented and discussed in the OER Handbook to complete and share a lesson plan. A review of the materials concerning copyright, finding and evaluating of OERs is expected before exploring this module.


Objectives

1. You will be exploring the technical considerations of OER use and creation.
2. You will be examining how existing resources can be reused / remixed into OERs.
3. You will put into practice the design and creation of an OER.
4. Case-based evidence: OERs at work. You will review a manuscript that describes how open educational resources can not only aid efforts of design and development of technology, but also be a valuable educational tool in itself.
5. You will explore the options for choosing your own licensing and consider the options in light of the future of OERs.
6. You will exercise these options by sharing the OER you created in this unit, or for a previous assignment.





Motivation

Why use OERs?

You may be pre-service or in-service teacher whose benefits of using OERs in your teaching seem obvious. The resources are often better than what would normally be available to you. They contain ideas and information you had not considered previously. It opens doors for collaboration and comparison with other classes similar to your own. It provides a means of access to lesson plans you may not have to build from scratch to customize into your own lessons. Even if you're not an instructor, OERs may assist you in learning more about any subject or area of expertise you wish to encounter. Perhaps you are considering taking a class to pursue additional professional or personal interests--exploring OERs is an opportunity to provide you with that exposure. There are many other ways to use OERs, whether your are a professional educator or just interested in a particular topic. Accessing OERs is a way to gain access to information you would not otherwise be able to access.

Of course, OERs may have limitations as well. Are the resources your accessing vetted for quality? Are they from a reliable source? Do they come recommended by other teachers? Still other questions beyond that of quality exist. How might you integrate an existing OER into your practice? How do you go about re-mixing that resource? What are the rules for reuse? These questions are addressed in this unit on OER education, yet it is ultimately up to the creator, user and sharer of OERs to consider these issues as access continues to broaden.

Why share OERs?

When first approached about sharing an educational resource, most instructors (pre-service or otherwise) consider the options: to share, or not to share? Most teachers I've encountered who consider the issues of whether or not to share an OER of their creation have a few issues. Some reasons to NOT share that have been expressed:

"Why would I want to help a lazy teacher who refuses to create anything of their own?"

"I have had my resources re-used without my permission before. Why would I want to go through that again?"

"I have offered the use of my materials in the past, but when I saw them being put to use, they failed to properly reference me."

"I worry that my materials are not good enough. I do not necessarily want to open myself up to criticism. After all, I worked hard on them."

If you've been an instructor for any period of time, the chances are at least one of these issues rings true to your situation. How might you overcome them? Are they deal-breakers for you when considering to share an OER of your own? Or is it more realistic to promote the practice of good attribution, offer quality materials, at the expense of opening yourself to scrutiny?

On the other hand, there are positive reasons offered by teachers when deciding to share an OER. These include:

"Now I'll have a semi-permanent archive of my materials. That should enable more easily accessible and reliable access both for me and my student in the future."

"The idea that someone might take my materials and reuse them for other purposes I hadn't thought of is exciting!"

"I'd like to see how someone might take my materials and re-mix them into something entirely original. Improvements on my materials my benefit me and my students."

"I like the idea of giving back to the educational system, I'm doing my little part to make the world a better place."

"I like considering that my materials may outlive me. In this way, I make an impact beyond that of my classroom."


Institutions may also have good reasons to encourage the opening of their educational resources. A good example is the land-grant colleges within the United States, whose mission includes making available through extension as much access to education for their rural communities as possible. OERs support missions that include making available educational resources to those who can gain access, in this case, through the Internet.


Content

Step 1 - Task Definition


In this unit, we are going to learn about composing, adapting, designing and creating your own OERs for sharing. Then, we are going to learn about the impact of OER use and reuse. You will be creating a lesson plan based on your exploration of web resources, the OER Handbook, and (possibly) an existing lesson plan of your choice. You will likely be working alone during this unit, however collaboration and sharing of information is encouraged within the guidelines of appropriate academic integrity.
 
Then, you will gain practice and join an ever-expanding community of educators sharing their resources by uploading one of your lesson plans. You will be sharing this lesson plan based on your exploration of web resources, the OER Handbook, and an existing lesson plan of your creation.

Step 2 -Information Seeking and Review

The topics for this step include:

• Case-based evidence: OERs at work
• Choosing your own licensing and the future of OERs
• Sharing the OER you created in a previous assignment


Remember when completing the tasks listed below, the instructional objectives include:

• Exploring the impact of using OERs, sharing and remixing
• Examining the educational benefits of OERs from teacher and student
perspectives
• Exploring the importance of reviewing existing OERs
• Putting into practice licensing and sharing of an OER


Previously you covered readings and websites concerned with:

• Further review of OERs: national libraries and educational repositories
• Localizing, use and sharing of OERs

As part of that website review, you are now familiar with a couple of key websites associated with access and finding OERs for your use, including:



Next, explore search tools (some probably familiar to you, others not so much) dedicated to finding open resources for you and your students, such as:


A good plan is to review Chris Penny's chapter on Finding OERs earlier in this unit.
 

Step 3 -Instructional Design of OERs

So now that you've had a chance to review several online tools to help you create an OERs, consider how these tools embody good instructional design practices. Remember that just because a tool helped to create an OER for you, it still may not be an effective tool for learning. Did you consider your audience and their learning objectives? Did you properly analyze the learning context for the students of the unit? How did you consider separating the pieces of information into manageable sizes? In what order are you presenting them? Did you offer embedded opportunities for the audience to reflect on the information you have provided? Did you consider elements of interaction within your design? These kinds of questions go to a much larger field of instructional design principles and practices, critical for creating effective instruction.

1. Consider reviewing Merrill’s First Principles of Learning.
2. Consider reviewing Mayer’s Principles of Multimedia Learning.


Much has been written and studied on effective instructional design models--much more than can be adequately re-stated for this unit. The good news is that helpful resources exist that will assist an instructor in creating meaningful resources. Using OER search techniques will uncover a host of information regarding instructional design tips for teachers, both outside and within OER contexts. What is most important is to remember that effective teaching not only requires the building and making available useful instructional resources, but also considering the way in which those resources are offered in situ of the larger context of education.

Reflection - Using an OER


Having read and critically analyzed these materials, consider these questions that bridge from the chapter on "finding" to "creating" and "using" OERs:

1.    Compare your regular search techniques with those tools suggested above. What do you like / dislike about the dedicated tools? What makes them work better or worse than using a traditional search process?
2.    What is the purpose of the OCW Consortium? How does it work as a portal to potentially meaningful resources for students? For teachers?
3.    How does Instructional Architect work? Review a few units on a topic you have personal or professional interest in…are the lessons well-crafted? What could you do in improving them?
4.    There has been much discussion on how we can use technology to improve math-based lessons, and the library of virtual manipulatives is one resource that may assist in that effort. How do you see this repository as being different than the other kinds of open resources available to educators?
For the remaining portions of the assignment, look for and choose open resources using any number of search techniques or repositories up to this point.


Assessment - Using an OER



Directions:
Consider ways to use OERs for an audience of your choice. If you are a pre-service or in-service teacher, consider how an OER unit might be integrated into your classroom. Create an instructional unit that uses technology in a way (or ways) that would be beneficial to both teacher and student. Offer screenshots and/or examples as appropriate.

Describe the technology using specifics as needed.
Hint: How intricate does the lesson need to be? Support the unit by providing enough detail that you could “hand-off” the lesson to another instructor and the lesson could be implemented. What information would you need to provide a surrogate instructor?

Option 1: Create a new instructional unit or lesson plan that utilizes using enlvm.usu.edu , instructional architect, or any of the open resources explored to this point to help your students’ learning (in a unit of your choice). The plans should indicate the:
•    audience (who is in the class? what are their characteristics?)
•    instructional goals (what can the students expect to learn / practice?)
•    timeline (provide benchmark milestone information, if necessary)
•    procedure (provide adequate structure and directions during each step)
•    technology involved.
In a separate paragraph, describe the major facets of technology within the plan and how/why you think the integration of technology will assist teacher and student.

OR

Option 2: Modify an existing instructional unit or lesson plan to one that utilizes using enlvm.usu.edu , instructional architect, or any of the open resources explored to this point to help your students’ learning (in a unit of your choice). The plans should indicate the:
•    audience (who is in the class? what are their characteristics?)
•    instructional goals (what can the students expect to learn / practice?)
•    timeline (provide benchmark milestone information, if necessary)
•    procedure (provide adequate structure and directions during each step)
•    technology involved.
In a separate paragraph, describe the major modifications from the previous lesson and how/why you think the integration of technology has assisted teacher and student, and improved the lesson (practice/review/application). Offer the existing lesson as an attachment (or appendix).

Be sure to review Cynthia Gautreau's and Mike Searson's chapters on Creating OERs earlier in this unit.


Evaluation: Format and Submission

Format:
Remember to include your name and the name of the class in the header. Please use Times font, 12 point, double-spaced. Use APA formatting for citations and references (and any tables or figures). The instructional / lesson plan document can be of varying length, but try to keep the main body (previous appendix) under 5 pages in length.
Save the document in either Word 2004 (.doc) or Rich Text file format (.rtf) so that comments can be made and returned to you in the file. To turn in, please upload by using the internal LMS processes through the assignment submission area by the date and time indicated in the class schedule.

Name the document <first initial><last name>-planCreation.<extension>

For example, if your name was Brett Shelton, your document should have the following format: bshelton-planCreation.doc

Self-check - A Case of Using an OER


At this point in the unit, you are now familiar with several websites associated with access and finding OERs for your use, tools associated with finding OERs, and tools that help you create OERs from scratch. You’re now familiar with general concepts of licensing in order to share the OERs you create, reuse and remix.


Next, you’ll explore an article that demonstrates how the use of open-source materials actually aided in the learning process, and resulted in the development of an OER in itself! The reading is available as a companion document to this unit within Curriki, and is a draft manuscript of the eventual published article:

Shelton, B. E., Stowell, T., Scoresby, J., Alvarez, M., Capell, M. & Coates, C. (in press). A Frankenstein approach to open-source: The construction of a 3D
game engine as meaningful educational process.
IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies. (Issue/Vol TBD).

To finish this week’s lesson plan assignment, please review the final material in the electronically available Open Educational Resources for Educators Version 1.0 on licensing OERs  and conclusions; pp. 189-236, it is available here:
http://www.lulu.com/content/3692829

Having read and critically analyzed these materials, consider:

1. The article is fairly code-intensive given the computer science nature of the topic, so feel free to skip over the less-meaningful portions. Instead,
concentrate on the educational process of reviewing others’ work in order to reuse, remix, and recreate new materials. How might this work in your
situation, in your educational context? Can you find any situations in which your students already do something similar? What kinds of re-using
contexts could prove helpful to you in your class(es)?

2. In reviewing the licensing information more thoroughly than you may have previously, what types of licenses have you most encountered since searching and reviewing OERs? Why do you think that is the case? What types of licenses are most appealing for you and your work? Why?
For the remaining portions of the assignment, look for and choose open resources using any number of search techniques or repositories up to this point.

Assessment - Sharing an OER


Directions:

1. Log into Curriki by going through the account creation process, if you haven’t already done so.

a. Offer an appropriately thorough review of one (or more) of the resources on the website through the comment features available to you on

the website.

b. Consider suggestions on what you thought was most beneficial about the resource. Consider offering a suggestion on how it could be used that is

different than what the author’s stated purpose was. Consider offering a suggestion on how the resource could be improved, or could be enhanced,
through the combination of additional materials.

2. Contribute to Curriki your instructional / lesson plan created for your class on OERs (or, if you prefer and believe appropriate, a different lesson plan of your creation). Feel free to contribute more than one, but offer at least one.

3. Upload a document with your comments/review, plus the information about the particular resource you chose to offer commentary upon.

a. Provide enough information so that your instructor can find that resource with your comments from within the Curriki website.
b. Provide information to find the lesson plan you authored and shared to Curriki (a URL if possible).
c. In addition, provide some reflection on the sharing of your lesson plan, considering how/why you think this particular resource could be reused to

assist other teachers and students.  

As part of this upload process, remember you will need to consider licensing for your materials. A good idea is to review David Wiley's chapter on Licensing OERs earlier in this unit.

 
Evaluation: Format and Submission


Format:
Remember to include your name and the name of the class in the header. Please use Times font, 12 point, double-spaced. Use APA formatting for citations and references (and any tables or figures). This instructional / lesson plan document in particular can be of varying length, but it is expected to be less than 2 pages.

Save the document in either Word 2004 (.doc) or Rich Text file format (.rtf) so that comments can be made and returned to you in the file. To turn in, please upload by using the internal Blackboard processes through the assignment submission area by the date and time indicated in the class schedule.

Name the document <first initial><last name>-planSharing.<extension>

For example, if your name was Brett Shelton, your document should have the following format: bshelton-planSharing.doc

Notes for Instructors


General Requirements


GRADE LEVEL
Undergraduates and graduate students
Generally beyond 18 years old
 
LEARNER CHARACTERISTICS
Lesson should be appropriate for students of all ethnicities
Lesson should be appropriate for students of any economic background
Lessons should be gender-neutral
Minimal knowledge of OERs with some prior experience in reading, synthesis, reframing, extension and writing practices will be helpful
Varying attitudes and commitment of subject matter may be represented

LEARNING CONTEXT
Time: 1 week, equivalent to 2 -90 minute class periods
Classroom:
This class is taught using WebCT Blackboard, but could be applied to F2F or other online learning environments
Number of Students: variable

MATERIALS
Teacher website
Assignment Packet
URL
Open Educational Resources for Educators Version 1.0
Article offered as example of OER use/educational impact (see below for
reference)
Word processing software

TECHNOLOGY
Computer with Internet access
Electronic Assignment
Teacher website

INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN
Preparation:
    Verification of student’s access to the internet outside of school

Homework: See assignment for more details
    Student will respond through an electronic document by creating a response paper with options for completing the objectives
    Student will upload, as an assignment criteria, a lesson plan to an OER website
    Student will upload the assignment to the LMS (or submit through email)

Grading Criteria -See assignment for more details
    Assignment rubric
    Specific length and format
        Relevant, Analytical, and Appropriately Reflective

INSTRUCTION AND ACTIVITIES
OER Basic Unit Vocabulary:

Communities of Practice
Copyright
CD-ROM
CPU
Creative Commons
Curriki
DVD
Fair Use
Flash Drive
Gigabyte
Hard drive
Hardware
Information processing cycle
Input
Kilobyte
Megabyte
Non-rival good
Open Educational Resource (OER)
Operating System
Output
Processor
RAM
Reuse
Redistribute
Remix
Revise
ROM
Social Cognition
Software
Terabyte



Assessment and Reflection Script Notes

OBJECTIVES:
Instructor Rationale: Using information contained in the Open Educational Resources Handbook, this lesson will help students learn of the value of OER use and reuse by examining a specific case explained through a research and development article. Students will participate in and recognize the importance of sharing information about existing OER, before creating and finally sharing an OER of their own. Students will work to apply the concepts presented and discussed in the OER Handbook to complete the OER sharing activity.

ANTICIPATORY SET & INTRODUCTION 
Students enter their LMS to find a number of modules, separated into weeks of instruction. This is lesson plan is aimed at two weeks of instruction, and accompanies a discussion board dedicated to the topics related below. This topic meant to be a part of a class on OERs is meant to come toward the end of a 12-week course where classroom disruption has been highlighted, along with tools and strategies to enhance the educational experience from both teacher and student perspectives.


ASSIGNMENTS
A viable alternative to using word processing programs to have students complete their assignments (even open programs, as suggested here) is to use an online sharing tool such as Google docs to complete them. If this is the choice, then to address the assignment on "sharing" a student would likely need to create a separate copy of their materials for offline upload.

Professional Development - OER in the Classroom

Open Educational Resources (OER)

OER References and Supporting Documents

Using and Sharing OERs

Using and Sharing Open Educational Resources

 




Original image cc:attribution http://www.flickr.com/photos/danardvincente/


Introduction

This unit explores open educational resources and the critical role of this educational technology as one tool in the transformation of education. This module is designed as an introduction to composing, adapting, and designing your own Open Educational Resources (OERs), with a special emphasis on the using and sharing of OERs. Using information contained in the Open Educational Resources Handbook, this lesson will help students consider aspects of instructional design in order to create their own OER for sharing with others. Students will work to apply the concepts presented and discussed in the OER Handbook to complete and share a lesson plan. A review of the materials concerning copyright, finding and evaluating of OERs is expected before exploring this module.


Objectives

1. You will be exploring the technical considerations of OER use and creation.
2. You will be examining how existing resources can be reused / remixed into OERs.
3. You will put into practice the design and creation of an OER.
4. Case-based evidence: OERs at work. You will review a manuscript that describes how open educational resources can not only aid efforts of design and development of technology, but also be a valuable educational tool in itself.
5. You will explore the options for choosing your own licensing and consider the options in light of the future of OERs.
6. You will exercise these options by sharing the OER you created in this unit, or for a previous assignment.





Motivation

Why use OERs?

You may be pre-service or in-service teacher whose benefits of using OERs in your teaching seem obvious. The resources are often better than what would normally be available to you. They contain ideas and information you had not considered previously. It opens doors for collaboration and comparison with other classes similar to your own. It provides a means of access to lesson plans you may not have to build from scratch to customize into your own lessons. Even if you're not an instructor, OERs may assist you in learning more about any subject or area of expertise you wish to encounter. Perhaps you are considering taking a class to pursue additional professional or personal interests--exploring OERs is an opportunity to provide you with that exposure. There are many other ways to use OERs, whether your are a professional educator or just interested in a particular topic. Accessing OERs is a way to gain access to information you would not otherwise be able to access.

Of course, OERs may have limitations as well. Are the resources your accessing vetted for quality? Are they from a reliable source? Do they come recommended by other teachers? Still other questions beyond that of quality exist. How might you integrate an existing OER into your practice? How do you go about re-mixing that resource? What are the rules for reuse? These questions are addressed in this unit on OER education, yet it is ultimately up to the creator, user and sharer of OERs to consider these issues as access continues to broaden.

Why share OERs?

When first approached about sharing an educational resource, most instructors (pre-service or otherwise) consider the options: to share, or not to share? Most teachers I've encountered who consider the issues of whether or not to share an OER of their creation have a few issues. Some reasons to NOT share that have been expressed:

"Why would I want to help a lazy teacher who refuses to create anything of their own?"

"I have had my resources re-used without my permission before. Why would I want to go through that again?"

"I have offered the use of my materials in the past, but when I saw them being put to use, they failed to properly reference me."

"I worry that my materials are not good enough. I do not necessarily want to open myself up to criticism. After all, I worked hard on them."

If you've been an instructor for any period of time, the chances are at least one of these issues rings true to your situation. How might you overcome them? Are they deal-breakers for you when considering to share an OER of your own? Or is it more realistic to promote the practice of good attribution, offer quality materials, at the expense of opening yourself to scrutiny?

On the other hand, there are positive reasons offered by teachers when deciding to share an OER. These include:

"Now I'll have a semi-permanent archive of my materials. That should enable more easily accessible and reliable access both for me and my student in the future."

"The idea that someone might take my materials and reuse them for other purposes I hadn't thought of is exciting!"

"I'd like to see how someone might take my materials and re-mix them into something entirely original. Improvements on my materials my benefit me and my students."

"I like the idea of giving back to the educational system, I'm doing my little part to make the world a better place."

"I like considering that my materials may outlive me. In this way, I make an impact beyond that of my classroom."


Institutions may also have good reasons to encourage the opening of their educational resources. A good example is the land-grant colleges within the United States, whose mission includes making available through extension as much access to education for their rural communities as possible. OERs support missions that include making available educational resources to those who can gain access, in this case, through the Internet.


Content

Step 1 - Task Definition


In this unit, we are going to learn about composing, adapting, designing and creating your own OERs for sharing. Then, we are going to learn about the impact of OER use and reuse. You will be creating a lesson plan based on your exploration of web resources, the OER Handbook, and (possibly) an existing lesson plan of your choice. You will likely be working alone during this unit, however collaboration and sharing of information is encouraged within the guidelines of appropriate academic integrity.
 
Then, you will gain practice and join an ever-expanding community of educators sharing their resources by uploading one of your lesson plans. You will be sharing this lesson plan based on your exploration of web resources, the OER Handbook, and an existing lesson plan of your creation.

Step 2 -Information Seeking and Review

The topics for this step include:

• Case-based evidence: OERs at work
• Choosing your own licensing and the future of OERs
• Sharing the OER you created in a previous assignment


Remember when completing the tasks listed below, the instructional objectives include:

• Exploring the impact of using OERs, sharing and remixing
• Examining the educational benefits of OERs from teacher and student
perspectives
• Exploring the importance of reviewing existing OERs
• Putting into practice licensing and sharing of an OER


Previously you covered readings and websites concerned with:

• Further review of OERs: national libraries and educational repositories
• Localizing, use and sharing of OERs

As part of that website review, you are now familiar with a couple of key websites associated with access and finding OERs for your use, including:



Next, explore search tools (some probably familiar to you, others not so much) dedicated to finding open resources for you and your students, such as:


A good plan is to review Chris Penny's chapter on Finding OERs earlier in this unit.
 

Step 3 -Instructional Design of OERs

So now that you've had a chance to review several online tools to help you create an OERs, consider how these tools embody good instructional design practices. Remember that just because a tool helped to create an OER for you, it still may not be an effective tool for learning. Did you consider your audience and their learning objectives? Did you properly analyze the learning context for the students of the unit? How did you consider separating the pieces of information into manageable sizes? In what order are you presenting them? Did you offer embedded opportunities for the audience to reflect on the information you have provided? Did you consider elements of interaction within your design? These kinds of questions go to a much larger field of instructional design principles and practices, critical for creating effective instruction.

1. Consider reviewing Merrill’s First Principles of Learning.
2. Consider reviewing Mayer’s Principles of Multimedia Learning.


Much has been written and studied on effective instructional design models--much more than can be adequately re-stated for this unit. The good news is that helpful resources exist that will assist an instructor in creating meaningful resources. Using OER search techniques will uncover a host of information regarding instructional design tips for teachers, both outside and within OER contexts. What is most important is to remember that effective teaching not only requires the building and making available useful instructional resources, but also considering the way in which those resources are offered in situ of the larger context of education.

Reflection - Using an OER


Having read and critically analyzed these materials, consider these questions that bridge from the chapter on "finding" to "creating" and "using" OERs:

1.    Compare your regular search techniques with those tools suggested above. What do you like / dislike about the dedicated tools? What makes them work better or worse than using a traditional search process?
2.    What is the purpose of the OCW Consortium? How does it work as a portal to potentially meaningful resources for students? For teachers?
3.    How does Instructional Architect work? Review a few units on a topic you have personal or professional interest in…are the lessons well-crafted? What could you do in improving them?
4.    There has been much discussion on how we can use technology to improve math-based lessons, and the library of virtual manipulatives is one resource that may assist in that effort. How do you see this repository as being different than the other kinds of open resources available to educators?
For the remaining portions of the assignment, look for and choose open resources using any number of search techniques or repositories up to this point.


Assessment - Using an OER



Directions:
Consider ways to use OERs for an audience of your choice. If you are a pre-service or in-service teacher, consider how an OER unit might be integrated into your classroom. Create an instructional unit that uses technology in a way (or ways) that would be beneficial to both teacher and student. Offer screenshots and/or examples as appropriate.

Describe the technology using specifics as needed.
Hint: How intricate does the lesson need to be? Support the unit by providing enough detail that you could “hand-off” the lesson to another instructor and the lesson could be implemented. What information would you need to provide a surrogate instructor?

Option 1: Create a new instructional unit or lesson plan that utilizes using enlvm.usu.edu , instructional architect, or any of the open resources explored to this point to help your students’ learning (in a unit of your choice). The plans should indicate the:
•    audience (who is in the class? what are their characteristics?)
•    instructional goals (what can the students expect to learn / practice?)
•    timeline (provide benchmark milestone information, if necessary)
•    procedure (provide adequate structure and directions during each step)
•    technology involved.
In a separate paragraph, describe the major facets of technology within the plan and how/why you think the integration of technology will assist teacher and student.

OR

Option 2: Modify an existing instructional unit or lesson plan to one that utilizes using enlvm.usu.edu , instructional architect, or any of the open resources explored to this point to help your students’ learning (in a unit of your choice). The plans should indicate the:
•    audience (who is in the class? what are their characteristics?)
•    instructional goals (what can the students expect to learn / practice?)
•    timeline (provide benchmark milestone information, if necessary)
•    procedure (provide adequate structure and directions during each step)
•    technology involved.
In a separate paragraph, describe the major modifications from the previous lesson and how/why you think the integration of technology has assisted teacher and student, and improved the lesson (practice/review/application). Offer the existing lesson as an attachment (or appendix).

Be sure to review Cynthia Gautreau's and Mike Searson's chapters on Creating OERs earlier in this unit.


Evaluation: Format and Submission

Format:
Remember to include your name and the name of the class in the header. Please use Times font, 12 point, double-spaced. Use APA formatting for citations and references (and any tables or figures). The instructional / lesson plan document can be of varying length, but try to keep the main body (previous appendix) under 5 pages in length.
Save the document in either Word 2004 (.doc) or Rich Text file format (.rtf) so that comments can be made and returned to you in the file. To turn in, please upload by using the internal LMS processes through the assignment submission area by the date and time indicated in the class schedule.

Name the document <first initial><last name>-planCreation.<extension>

For example, if your name was Brett Shelton, your document should have the following format: bshelton-planCreation.doc

Self-check - A Case of Using an OER


At this point in the unit, you are now familiar with several websites associated with access and finding OERs for your use, tools associated with finding OERs, and tools that help you create OERs from scratch. You’re now familiar with general concepts of licensing in order to share the OERs you create, reuse and remix.


Next, you’ll explore an article that demonstrates how the use of open-source materials actually aided in the learning process, and resulted in the development of an OER in itself! The reading is available as a companion document to this unit within Curriki, and is a draft manuscript of the eventual published article:

Shelton, B. E., Stowell, T., Scoresby, J., Alvarez, M., Capell, M. & Coates, C. (in press). A Frankenstein approach to open-source: The construction of a 3D
game engine as meaningful educational process.
IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies. (Issue/Vol TBD).

To finish this week’s lesson plan assignment, please review the final material in the electronically available Open Educational Resources for Educators Version 1.0 on licensing OERs  and conclusions; pp. 189-236, it is available here:
http://www.lulu.com/content/3692829

Having read and critically analyzed these materials, consider:

1. The article is fairly code-intensive given the computer science nature of the topic, so feel free to skip over the less-meaningful portions. Instead,
concentrate on the educational process of reviewing others’ work in order to reuse, remix, and recreate new materials. How might this work in your
situation, in your educational context? Can you find any situations in which your students already do something similar? What kinds of re-using
contexts could prove helpful to you in your class(es)?

2. In reviewing the licensing information more thoroughly than you may have previously, what types of licenses have you most encountered since searching and reviewing OERs? Why do you think that is the case? What types of licenses are most appealing for you and your work? Why?
For the remaining portions of the assignment, look for and choose open resources using any number of search techniques or repositories up to this point.

Assessment - Sharing an OER


Directions:

1. Log into Curriki by going through the account creation process, if you haven’t already done so.

a. Offer an appropriately thorough review of one (or more) of the resources on the website through the comment features available to you on

the website.

b. Consider suggestions on what you thought was most beneficial about the resource. Consider offering a suggestion on how it could be used that is

different than what the author’s stated purpose was. Consider offering a suggestion on how the resource could be improved, or could be enhanced,
through the combination of additional materials.

2. Contribute to Curriki your instructional / lesson plan created for your class on OERs (or, if you prefer and believe appropriate, a different lesson plan of your creation). Feel free to contribute more than one, but offer at least one.

3. Upload a document with your comments/review, plus the information about the particular resource you chose to offer commentary upon.

a. Provide enough information so that your instructor can find that resource with your comments from within the Curriki website.
b. Provide information to find the lesson plan you authored and shared to Curriki (a URL if possible).
c. In addition, provide some reflection on the sharing of your lesson plan, considering how/why you think this particular resource could be reused to

assist other teachers and students.  

As part of this upload process, remember you will need to consider licensing for your materials. A good idea is to review David Wiley's chapter on Licensing OERs earlier in this unit.

 
Evaluation: Format and Submission


Format:
Remember to include your name and the name of the class in the header. Please use Times font, 12 point, double-spaced. Use APA formatting for citations and references (and any tables or figures). This instructional / lesson plan document in particular can be of varying length, but it is expected to be less than 2 pages.

Save the document in either Word 2004 (.doc) or Rich Text file format (.rtf) so that comments can be made and returned to you in the file. To turn in, please upload by using the internal Blackboard processes through the assignment submission area by the date and time indicated in the class schedule.

Name the document <first initial><last name>-planSharing.<extension>

For example, if your name was Brett Shelton, your document should have the following format: bshelton-planSharing.doc

Notes for Instructors


General Requirements


GRADE LEVEL
Undergraduates and graduate students
Generally beyond 18 years old
 
LEARNER CHARACTERISTICS
Lesson should be appropriate for students of all ethnicities
Lesson should be appropriate for students of any economic background
Lessons should be gender-neutral
Minimal knowledge of OERs with some prior experience in reading, synthesis, reframing, extension and writing practices will be helpful
Varying attitudes and commitment of subject matter may be represented

LEARNING CONTEXT
Time: 1 week, equivalent to 2 -90 minute class periods
Classroom:
This class is taught using WebCT Blackboard, but could be applied to F2F or other online learning environments
Number of Students: variable

MATERIALS
Teacher website
Assignment Packet
URL
Open Educational Resources for Educators Version 1.0
Article offered as example of OER use/educational impact (see below for
reference)
Word processing software

TECHNOLOGY
Computer with Internet access
Electronic Assignment
Teacher website

INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN
Preparation:
    Verification of student’s access to the internet outside of school

Homework: See assignment for more details
    Student will respond through an electronic document by creating a response paper with options for completing the objectives
    Student will upload, as an assignment criteria, a lesson plan to an OER website
    Student will upload the assignment to the LMS (or submit through email)

Grading Criteria -See assignment for more details
    Assignment rubric
    Specific length and format
        Relevant, Analytical, and Appropriately Reflective

INSTRUCTION AND ACTIVITIES
OER Basic Unit Vocabulary:

Communities of Practice
Copyright
CD-ROM
CPU
Creative Commons
Curriki
DVD
Fair Use
Flash Drive
Gigabyte
Hard drive
Hardware
Information processing cycle
Input
Kilobyte
Megabyte
Non-rival good
Open Educational Resource (OER)
Operating System
Output
Processor
RAM
Reuse
Redistribute
Remix
Revise
ROM
Social Cognition
Software
Terabyte



Assessment and Reflection Script Notes

OBJECTIVES:
Instructor Rationale: Using information contained in the Open Educational Resources Handbook, this lesson will help students learn of the value of OER use and reuse by examining a specific case explained through a research and development article. Students will participate in and recognize the importance of sharing information about existing OER, before creating and finally sharing an OER of their own. Students will work to apply the concepts presented and discussed in the OER Handbook to complete the OER sharing activity.

ANTICIPATORY SET & INTRODUCTION 
Students enter their LMS to find a number of modules, separated into weeks of instruction. This is lesson plan is aimed at two weeks of instruction, and accompanies a discussion board dedicated to the topics related below. This topic meant to be a part of a class on OERs is meant to come toward the end of a 12-week course where classroom disruption has been highlighted, along with tools and strategies to enhance the educational experience from both teacher and student perspectives.


ASSIGNMENTS
A viable alternative to using word processing programs to have students complete their assignments (even open programs, as suggested here) is to use an online sharing tool such as Google docs to complete them. If this is the choice, then to address the assignment on "sharing" a student would likely need to create a separate copy of their materials for offline upload.

Copyright and Open Educational Resources: Introduction Video

David Wiley introduces his unit on Copyright Law and Licensing with OER. This video was designed to be viewed before initiating the second unit, Licensing: Know Your Rights, of the course, Integrating Open Educational Resources in the Classroom.

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Euclid

 

This is an overview of Euclid's life and work. (1 minute, 30 seconds)