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    We’re finally to the end of our time together here on Crash Course Study Skills, so this week we’re taking a more holistic approach to being the best learner you can. Part of taking care of your brain is taking care of your whole body, of which your brain is a part. We’re wrapping up this course by outlining some good tips and tricks for maint…[Read more]

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    Writing research papers is an essential skill in your career as a student, and this week we’re going to help you do that like a pro. From figuring out where to begin, to finding the best systems, to breaking out of “research recursion system” (maybe just figuring out what that means), we’ve got you covered.

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    Exams can be terrifying. It’s easy to feel like the weight of the world rests in these moments – like this one test determines your grades and, in turn, your whole future – even if you know, rationally, that this isn’t really the case. What’s worse is that this fear and anxiety can make you do worse on the test. So, take a deep breath, and let u…[Read more]

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    It turns out that saving all of your studying until after midnight on the night before your big exam is not actually a great way to prepare. Today, Thomas explains some test prep strategies that actually work.

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    You’re on YouTube right now, but you should probably be studying or writing that research paper. But as long as you’re here, we’re going to help you figure out how to get the better of your desire to procrastinate in the future. Just don’t forget about us when you fully master your procrastination, OK?

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    Have you ever noticed how easy it is to get distracted while studying – even when you know you really don’t have time for Facebook, Snapchat, Cookie Clicker, or whatever else is calling you? This week we’re going to help you get a better handle on your focus and concentration and how to improve those skills.

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    The best way to make sure you’re making the most of the time you have is to start off well organized. This week we’re talking about planning and organizational systems and how to set yourself up for success.

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    An essential part of learning and studying is remembering things, so this week Thomas explains some of how your memory works so that you can spend less time working against your memory’s limitations and more time playing to its real strengths.

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    Leaving the bookstore at the beginning of the semester you’re probably wondering how the heck you’re going to get through all of that reading. Today we’re explaining how much of that reading you really need to do and the best strategies for making your way through it.Leaving the bookstore at

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    The first step in honing your new study skills is to take better notes. This week Thomas will tell you everything you need to know to come to class prepared and find a note-taking system that will help you retain and review like a champ.

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    In our SERIES FINALE of Crash Course Computer Science we take a look towards the future! In the past 70 years electronic computing has fundamentally changed how we live our lives, and we believe it’s just getting started. From ubiquitous computing, artificial intelligence, and self-driving cars to brain computer interfaces, wearable computers, a…[Read more]

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    Today we’re going to go a little meta and talk about how computer science can support learning with educational technology. We here at Crash Course are big fans of interactive in-class learning and hands-on experiences, but we also believe in the additive power of educational technology inside and outside the classroom from the Internet itself a…[Read more]

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    We’ve spent most of this series talking about computers. Which makes sense – this is Crash Course COMPUTER SCIENCE after all. But at their core computers are tools employed by humans and humans are pretty complicated. So today, we’re going to discuss some psychological considerations in building computers like how to make them easier for hum…[Read more]

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    We’ve spent most of this series talking about computers. Which makes sense – this is Crash Course COMPUTER SCIENCE after all. But at their core computers are tools employed by humans and humans are pretty complicated. So today, we’re going to discuss some psychological considerations in building computers like how to make them easier for hum…[Read more]

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    Today we’re going to talk about robots! Robots are often thought as a technology of the future, but they’re already here by the millions in the workplace, our homes, and pretty soon on the roads. We’ll discuss the origins of robotics to its proliferation, and even look at some common control designs that were implemented to make them more useful…[Read more]

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    Today we’re going to talk about how computers understand speech and speak themselves. As computers play an increasing role in our daily lives there has been an growing demand for voice user interfaces, but speech is also terribly complicated. Vocabularies are diverse, sentence structures can often dictate the meaning of certain words, and c…[Read more]

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    Today we’re going to talk about how computers see. We’ve long known that our digital cameras and smartphones can take incredibly detailed images, but taking pictures is not quite the same thing. For the past half-century, computer scientists have been working to help our computing devices understand the imagery they capture, leading to adv…[Read more]

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    So we’ve talked a lot in this series about how computers fetch and display data, but how do they make decisions on this data? From spam filters and self-driving cars, to cutting edge medical diagnosis and real-time language translation, there has been an increasing need for our computers to learn from data and apply that knowledge to make…[Read more]

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    Today we’re going to talk about how to keep information secret, and this isn’t a new goal. From as early as Julius Caesar’s Caesar cipher to Mary, Queen of Scots, encrypted messages to kill Queen Elizabeth in 1587, theres has long been a need to encrypt and decrypt private correspondence. This proved especially critical during World War II as Al…[Read more]

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    Today we’re going to talk about hackers and their strategies for breaking into computer systems. Now, not all hackers are are malicious cybercriminals intent on stealing your data (these people are known as Black Hats). There are also White Hats who hunt for bugs, close security holes, and perform security evaluations for companies. And there are…[Read more]

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