Type:

Interactive, Other

Description:

This exploration allows you to travel to the tiny world of DNA. Beginning with the body and ending with the atoms that make up a single DNA base, you'll be able to zoom in to 15 different levels to see DNA's relationship to us as a whole. Along the way you'll also see the intricate bending and winding that takes place within a chromosome, which allows more than five feet of DNA to fit within the nucleus of a tiny cell. This resource is part of the Biology Links for One Laptop Per Child course which contains units on Exploring Life; The Cell; Genetics; Mechanisms of Evolution; The Evolutionary History of Biological Diversity; Plant Form and Function; Animal Form and Function; Ecology; and Astrobiology.

Subjects:

  • Science > General
  • Science > Biology

Education Levels:

  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10
  • Grade 11
  • Grade 12

Keywords:

DNA chromosome gene double-helix genome student-facing animation flash

Language:

English
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Curriki Rating
On a scale of 0 to 3
3
On a scale of 0 to 3

This resource was reviewed using the Curriki Review rubric and received an overall Curriki Review System rating of 3, as of 2010-03-31.

Component Ratings:

Technical Completeness: 3
Content Accuracy: 3
Appropriate Pedagogy: 0

Reviewer Comments:

This is an external link to a NOVA online interactive. Users can zoom in from the whole body level to the atomic level by clicking through each of 15 slides that are progressively more “zoomed-in.” Explanatory text is included at each step. There is no particular user interactivity or feedback.
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Emily Conwell
April 10, 2013
I think that the visualization in the flash animation is good. It does a good job of breaking DNA down into 15 compartments that help students understand how it is…
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Mike Archibald
August 1, 2010
The following lesson plan provides great insight for students to go through the various levels of cellular organization in the human body. I think it does a great job of…
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h barlaam
March 20, 2010
What the above reviewer said is true; it is mostly just clicking with some reading as well. It would be up to the teacher to provide more active thinking. However,…
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temp CSTA
October 24, 2009
nice animation, but just passive click through, no exploratin or active thinking/processing involved. Jason Hodin Stanford University
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Janet Pinto
this is way cool!

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