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Gr. 6-8 Test Prep for New ELA 2010-2011

by Sue Costagliola East Meadow School District

One primary goal for middle school educators is to prepare children for high school and life. Students will be required to take standardized tests throughout their lives. One aspect of the NYS ELA Assessment is recognizing errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and mechanics. This is also necessary for future success on the English Regents Exam and the SATs. In addition, it is important that children recognize the impact of figurative language on writing. Understanding this impacts their ability to be successful readers and writers. Since the NYS ELA Assessment will be revised for 2011, practice worksheets were created for grades 6-8 to parallel this new format. In an effort to make these materials useful, each practice worksheet was created with the existing grade level curriculum in mind. Excerpts were taken from literature used in the ELA or social studies classrooms.
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Gr. 6 ELA Test Prep 2010-2011

by Sue Costagliola East Meadow School District

In recent years, New York State has raised the standards for students’ performance in the area of ELA. As a result of these new state standards, both teachers and students face tremendous pressure to succeed. Last year, the state raised the bar and changed the cut scores on the NYS ELA exam. Based on the new scores and what the state deems as “passing”, there has been an influx of students who require AIS services in the area of reading and writing. All of the above factors have changed the climate in all classrooms. The emphasis on reading and writing across the curriculum has never been greater. All teachers in all subject areas have now had to change their focus in the classroom. A common language is necessary among all classes, so that students can make connections in literacy among all subject areas. Teachers need to be exposed to the language and test terms commonly used on the NYS ELA exam, so that they can begin using them on their own tests and in their daily classroom discussion.
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Gr. 6 ELA Core Curriculum 2010-11

by Sue Costagliola East Meadow School District

Through this Introduction to Memoir Book Circles Unit, we promote literacy and expand our students’ exposure to the genre of non-fiction, through the sub-genre of memoir. Lessons and handouts are included which will direct the sixth grade teacher to successfully begin to facilitate this Introduction to Memoir Book Circle unit. In order to differentiate instruction, and to challenge all of our readers, students will read full-length memoir novels in addition to smaller memoir texts. Assessments are provided that follow this unit. Students will go through the writing process to produce a published memoir. Students will also read a full-length memoir in homogeneous book circles.
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Gr. 7 English Curriculum Writing

by Sue Costagliola East Meadow School District

The East Meadow School District will be adopting the Common Core Curriculum Standards in Literacy and English Language Arts. The English teachers will incorporate these standards into their unit design to ensure texts are aligned with the complex requirements outlined in the standards. Within this unit, a collection of texts have been selected as our anchor texts. These texts were selected for careful close reading. This unit was developed by seventh grade teachers from Clarke and Woodland and the AUSSIE consultant. This collaboration will provide curriculum alignment in both middle schools. Seventh grade students begin the year by exploring short stories. Exploring a unit of short stories offers students many opportunities to internalize and apply the knowledge they gain about reading and interpreting literature to the next story they read. They are more frequently exposed to the craft of using language, the literary devices that authors use, and how these can make a story successful or unsuccessful for a reader. The short stories themselves contain underlying themes or motifs that challenge the students to draw broader conclusions from the material, encouraging students to think on a wider level about interconnected issues and themes that run throughout the materials.
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