Type:

E-book

Description:

This is an "everything-that-you-need-to-know" guide before you write your first college level, expository essay through to your doctoral dissertaion.

Subjects:

  • Education > General
  • Language Arts > General

Education Levels:

  • Grade 11
  • Grade 12
  • Higher Education
  • Graduate
  • Undergraduate-Upper Division
  • Undergraduate-Lower Division

Keywords:

college-level expository writing

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Members

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Update Standards?

LA.11-12.WS.1.1: English-Language Arts

Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of discourse (e.g., purpose, speaker, audience, form) when completing narrative, expository, persuasive, or descriptive writing assignments.

LA.11-12.WS.1.2: English-Language Arts

Use point of view, characterization, style (e.g., use of irony), and related elements for specific rhetorical and aesthetic purposes.

LA.11-12.WS.1.3: English-Language Arts

Structure ideas and arguments in a sustained, persuasive, and sophisticated way and support them with precise and relevant examples.

LA.11-12.WS.1.4: English-Language Arts

Enhance meaning by employing rhetorical devices, including the extended use of parallelism, repetition, and analogy; the incorporation of visual aids (e.g., graphs, tables, pictures); and the issuance of a call for action.

LA.11-12.WS.1.5: English-Language Arts

Use language in natural, fresh, and vivid ways to establish a specific tone.

LA.11-12.WS.1.6: English-Language Arts

Develop presentations by using clear research questions and creative and critical research strategies (e.g., field studies, oral histories, interviews, experiments, electronic sources).

LA.11-12.WS.1.9: English-Language Arts

Revise text to highlight the individual voice, improve sentence variety and style, and enhance subtlety of meaning and tone in ways that are consistent with the purpose, audience, and genre.

LA.11-12.WC.1.1: English-Language Arts

Demonstrate control of grammar, diction, and paragraph and sentence structure and an understanding of English usage.

LA.11-12.WC.1.2: English-Language Arts

Produce legible work that shows accurate spelling and correct punctuation and capitalization.

LA.11-12.WC.1.3: English-Language Arts

Reflect appropriate manuscript requirements in writing.

WRI.9-10.1.1.1.a: Writing

Gathers, analyzes, synthesizes, and organizes information from a variety of sources (e.g., interviews, websites, books, field notes).

WRI.9-10.1.1.1.c: Writing

Uses prewriting stage to generate ideas, determine purpose, analyze audience, select form, research background information, formulate a thesis, and organize text.

WRI.9-10.1.2.1.a: Writing

Refers to prewriting plan.

WRI.9-10.1.2.1.b: Writing

Drafts according to audience, purpose, and time.

WRI.9-10.1.2.1.c: Writing

Drafts by hand and/or electronically.

WRI.9-10.1.2.1.d: Writing

Assesses draft and/or feedback, decides if multiple drafts are necessary, and justifies decision.

WRI.9-10.1.3.1.a: Writing

Selects and uses effective revision tools or strategies based on project (e.g., sentence analysis form, revision criteria checklist, "find-and-replace" or "track changes" functions of word processing program).

WRI.9-10.1.3.1.b: Writing

Rereads work several times and has a different focus for each reading (e.g., first reading - looking for the strength or effectiveness of an argument and organizational structure; second reading - considering appropriateness for audience and purpose; third reading - looking for clarity of persuasive language).

WRI.9-10.1.3.1.h: Writing

Uses multiple resources to improve text (e.g., writing guide, assignment criteria, Internet grammar guide, peer, thesaurus, dictionary).

WRI.9-10.1.4.1.a: Writing

Identifies and corrects errors in conventions.

WRI.9-10.1.4.1.b: Writing

Uses appropriate references and resources (e.g., dictionary, writing/style guide, electronic spelling and grammar check, adult, peer).

WRI.9-10.1.4.1.c: Writing

Edits with a critical eye, often using a self-initiated checklist or editing guide (e.g., editing symbols, paper submission guidelines).

WRI.9-10.1.4.1.d: Writing

Proofreads final draft for errors.

WRI.9-10.1.6.1.a: Writing

Revises at any stage of process.

WRI.9-10.1.6.1.b: Writing

Edits as needed at any stage.

WRI.9-10.3.1.1.a: Writing

Presents a manageable thesis while maintaining a consistent focus in an individualized and purposeful manner (e.g., "Obtaining a driver's license should not be tied to grades in school.").

WRI.9-10.3.1.1.b: Writing

Selects specific details relevant to the topic to extend ideas or develop elaboration (e.g., quotations, data, reasons, multiple examples that build on each other).

WRI.9-10.3.1.1.c: Writing

Uses personal experiences, observations, and/or research from a variety of sources to support opinions and ideas (e.g., relevant data to support conclusions in math, science, social studies; appropriate researched information to explain or persuade; contrasting points of view to support a hypothesis or argument).

WRI.9-10.3.1.1.d: Writing

Integrates the elements of character, setting, and plot to create a convincing fictional world.

WRI.9-10.3.1.2.a: Writing

Writes unified, cohesive paragraphs (e.g., repetition of key terms; parallel structure).

WRI.9-10.3.1.2.b: Writing

Selects from a variety of opening strategies and composes an engaging introduction (e.g., vivid, detailed description; historical/cultural background; contrasting situation).

WRI.9-10.3.1.2.c: Writing

Selects from a variety of ending/ conclusion strategies and composes an effective conclusion that is more than a repetition of the introduction (e.g., prediction, anecdote, question).

WRI.9-10.3.1.2.d: Writing

Uses transitional words and phrases between paragraphs to signal emphasis or show logical relationships among ideas (e.g., in fact ..., consequently ..., as a result ..., on the other hand ...).

WRI.9-10.3.1.2.e: Writing

Determines effective sequence between and within paragraphs by using transitions to emphasize points in an argument or show logical connections (e.g., inasmuch as ..., possibly ..., therefore ...).

WRI.9-10.3.1.2.g: Writing

Emphasizes key ideas through appropriate use of text features (e.g., headings, diagrams, graphs, bullets, blank space).

WRI.9-10.3.2.1.a: Writing

Writes with a clearly defined voice appropriate to audience.

WRI.9-10.3.2.1.b: Writing

Writes in an individual, knowledgeable, and consistent voice in expository, technical, and persuasive writing.

WRI.9-10.3.2.1.c: Writing

Selects appropriate point of view for technical writing and/or specific content areas (e.g., third-person point of view for science lab write-ups, first person for field journals, second person for how-to technical manuals).

WRI.9-10.3.2.2.a: Writing

Selects and uses precise language to persuade or inform.

WRI.9-10.3.2.3.a: Writing

Writes a variety of sentence structures and lengths to create a cadence appropriate for diverse audiences, purposes, and forms.

WRI.9-10.3.2.3.b: Writing

Writes a variety of sentence structures (e.g., absolutes to add detail and elaborate: "Fingers gripping the table, the student waited for the results.").

WRI.9-10.3.2.3.c: Writing

Writes short sentences and phrases in technical writing.

WRI.9-10.3.2.3.d: Writing

Uses a variety of sentence structures (e.g., line breaks, stanzas, pattern, repetition) to purposefully shape a poem.

WRI.9-10.3.3.2.d: Writing

Uses resources to correct own spelling.

WRI.9-10.3.3.3.a: Writing

Uses capitalization rules from previous grades.

WRI.9-10.3.3.3.b: Writing

Uses resources to check capitalization.

WRI.9-10.3.3.4.a: Writing

Uses punctuation rules from previous grades.

WRI.9-10.3.3.4.b: Writing

Uses commas to set off nonrestrictive clauses (e.g., The gym, which was built last year, is used every day.).

WRI.9-10.3.3.4.c: Writing

Uses brackets around an editorial correction or to set off added words.

WRI.9-10.3.3.4.d: Writing

Uses the em dash (-) to indicate emphasis or a sudden break, to set off an introductory series, or to show interrupted speech.

WRI.9-10.3.3.4.e: Writing

Use appropriate punctuation when writing in other languages (e.g., René).

WRI.9-10.3.3.4.f: Writing

Uses resources to check punctuation.

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.a: Writing

Applies usage rules from previous grades.

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.b: Writing

Avoids dangling modifiers (e.g., "After I stood in line for hours, I discovered the tickets were sold out." Incorrect: "After standing in line for hours, the tickets were sold out." The second sentence makes it appear that the tickets were in line.).

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.c: Writing

Uses who vs. whom correctly.

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.d: Writing

Uses that vs. which and that vs. who correctly.

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.e: Writing

Uses either ... or and neither ... nor correctly.

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.f: Writing

Uses many commonly confused words correctly (e.g., accept vs. except or can vs. may).

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.g: Writing

Uses active voice except when passive voice is appropriate (e.g., active voice: "They saw it." vs. passive voice: "It was seen by them.").

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.h.1: Writing

parallel: The coach told the players they should get plenty of sleep, they should eat well, and they should do some warm-up exercises.

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.h.2: Writing

not parallel: The coach told the players they should get plenty of sleep, that they should eat well, and to do some warm up exercises.

WRI.9-10.3.3.5.i: Writing

Uses resources to check usage.

WRI.9-10.3.3.6.a: Writing

May use fragments in dialogue as appropriate.

WRI.9-10.3.3.7.a: Writing

Uses paragraph conventions (e.g., designated by indentation or block format, skipping lines between paragraphs).

WRI.9-10.3.3.7.b: Writing

Uses textual markers (e.g., page numbers, footnotes, space for pictures).

WRI.9-10.3.3.8.a: Writing

Cites sources according to prescribed format (e.g., MLA, APA, Turabian).
Curriki Rating
On a scale of 0 to 3
3
On a scale of 0 to 3

This resource was reviewed using the Curriki Review rubric and received an overall Curriki Review System rating of 3, as of 2010-08-01.

Component Ratings:

Technical Completeness: 3
Content Accuracy: 3
Appropriate Pedagogy: 3

Reviewer Comments:

This strong resource is a guide in how-to write a college essay. Based on the philosophy that the “act of writing trains and develops the act of thinking,” this paper tells the student how to do that. The writer’s tools are a dictionary, thesaurus, and word processing program. This guide is peppered with specific advice, such as keep an electronic copy, format detail, style manuals, etc. etc. Students are also advised that better writers read good writers and write a lot. Brainstorming, clustering, free writing, collecting, shaping, reshaping, revising, proofreading and a strong thesis statement are all essential parts of writing for college. A rubric is included with helps the student asses his or her expository writing in 16 areas.
member-name
J. E. Freed
August 1, 2010

I wish I had known all of this material before I had submitted my first college-level essay; therefore I reveal all of our writing teacher secrets in advance to my students in this brief guide. JEF

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