Type:

Unit

Description:

This collection contains a complete set of resources for teaching Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, including twenty-two daily lesson plans with discussion points; anticipatory activities; a pacing guide for students; suggested homework, classwork, and project extensions; connections to a social studies curriculum on World War II; suggestions for further reading, viewing and experiencing; and a sample essay test.

Subjects:

  • Language Arts > General

Education Levels:

  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10

Keywords:

Anne Frank "Diary of a Young Girl" Diary Holocaust Judaism Jewish Jews World War 2 WW2

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Members

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Update Standards?

LA.6.RC.2.3: English-Language Arts

Connect and clarify main ideas by identifying their relationships to other sources and related topics.

LA.6.RC.2.4: English-Language Arts

Clarify an understanding of texts by creating outlines, logical notes, summaries, or reports.

LA.6.RL.3.2: English-Language Arts

Analyze the effect of the qualities of the character (e.g., courage or cowardice, ambition or laziness) on the plot and the resolution of the conflict.

LA.6.RL.3.3: English-Language Arts

Analyze the influence of setting on the problem and its resolution.

LA.6.RL.3.5: English-Language Arts

Identify the speaker and recognize the difference between first- and third-person narration (e.g., autobiography compared with biography).

LA.6.RL.3.6: English-Language Arts

Identify and analyze features of themes conveyed through characters, actions, and images.

LA.6.RL.3.8: English-Language Arts

Critique the credibility of characterization and the degree to which a plot is contrived or realistic (e.g., compare use of fact and fantasy in historical fiction).

LA.7.RC.2.4: English-Language Arts

Identify and trace the development of an author's argument, point of view, or perspective in text.

LA.7.RL.3.1: English-Language Arts

Articulate the expressed purposes and characteristics of different forms of prose (e.g., short story, novel, novella, essay).

LA.7.RL.3.3: English-Language Arts

Analyze characterization as delineated through a character's thoughts, words, speech patterns, and actions; the narrator's description; and the thoughts, words, and actions of other characters.

LA.7.RL.3.4: English-Language Arts

Identify and analyze recurring themes across works (e.g., the value of bravery, loyalty, and friendship; the effects of loneliness).

LA.7.RL.3.5: English-Language Arts

Contrast points of view (e.g., first and third person, limited and omniscient, subjective and objective) in narrative text and explain how they affect the overall theme of the work.

LA.7.RL.3.6: English-Language Arts

Analyze a range of responses to a literary work and determine the extent to which the literary elements in the work shaped those responses.

LA.8.RL.3.4: English-Language Arts

Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.

LA.8.RL.3.5: English-Language Arts

Identify and analyze recurring themes (e.g., good versus evil) across traditional and contemporary works.

LA.8.RL.3.7: English-Language Arts

Analyze a work of literature, showing how it reflects the heritage, traditions, attitudes, and beliefs of its author. (Biographical approach)

LA.9-10.RL.3.5: English-Language Arts

Compare works that express a universal theme and provide evidence to support the ideas expressed in each work.

LA.9-10.RL.3.9: English-Language Arts

Explain how voice, persona, and the choice of a narrator affect characterization and the tone, plot, and credibility of a text.

LA.9-10.RL.3.12: English-Language Arts

Analyze the way in which a work of literature is related to the themes and issues of its historical period. (Historical approach)

LA.6.LA.6.1.6.1: Reading and Language Arts

use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly;

LA.6.LA.6.1.6.2: Reading and Language Arts

listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text;

LA.6.LA.6.1.7.1: Reading and Language Arts

use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies, graphic representations, and knowledge of text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection;

LA.6.LA.6.1.7.2: Reading and Language Arts

analyze the author?s purpose (e.g., to persuade, inform, entertain, or explain) and perspective in a variety of texts and understand how they affect meaning;

LA.6.LA.6.1.7.3: Reading and Language Arts

determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level text through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details;

LA.6.LA.6.2.2.2: Reading and Language Arts

use information from the text to answer questions related to the main idea or relevant details, maintaining chronological or logical order;

LA.6.LA.6.2.2.3: Reading and Language Arts

organize information to show understanding (e.g., representing main ideas within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, or comparing/contrasting);

LA.6.LA.6.2.2.4: Reading and Language Arts

identify the characteristics of a variety of types of nonfiction text (e.g., reference works, newspapers, biographies, procedures, instructions, practical/functional texts); and

LA.6.LA.6.4.2.4: Reading and Language Arts

write a variety of informal communications (e.g., friendly letters, thank-you notes, messages) and formal communications (e.g., conventional business letters, invitations) that follow a format and that have a clearly stated purpose and that include the date, proper salutation, body, closing and signature; and

LA.7.LA.7.1.6.1: Reading and Language Arts

use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly;

LA.7.LA.7.1.6.2: Reading and Language Arts

listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text;

LA.7.LA.7.1.7.1: Reading and Language Arts

use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies, graphic representations, and knowledge of text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection;

LA.7.LA.7.1.7.2: Reading and Language Arts

analyze the author?s purpose (e.g., to persuade, inform, entertain, explain) and perspective in a variety of texts and understand how they affect meaning;

LA.7.LA.7.1.7.3: Reading and Language Arts

determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details;

LA.7.LA.7.2.2.2: Reading and Language Arts

use information from the text to state the main idea and/or provide relevant details;

LA.7.LA.7.2.2.3: Reading and Language Arts

organize information to show understanding (e.g., representing main ideas within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, or comparing/contrasting);

LA.7.LA.7.4.2.4: Reading and Language Arts

write a variety of informal communications (e.g., friendly letters, thank-you notes, messages) and formal communications (e.g., conventional business letters, invitations) that follow a format and that have a clearly stated purpose and that include the date, proper salutation, body, closing and signature; and

LA.8.LA.8.1.6.1: Reading and Language Arts

use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly;

LA.8.LA.8.1.6.2: Reading and Language Arts

listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text;

LA.8.LA.8.1.7.1: Reading and Language Arts

use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies, graphic representations, and knowledge of text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection;

LA.8.LA.8.1.7.2: Reading and Language Arts

analyze the author?s purpose and/or perspective in a variety of texts and understand how they effect meaning;

LA.8.LA.8.1.7.3: Reading and Language Arts

determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details;

LA.8.LA.8.2.2.2: Reading and Language Arts

synthesize and use information from the text to state the main idea or provide relevant details;

LA.8.LA.8.2.2.3: Reading and Language Arts

organize information to show understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and events (e.g., representing key points within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, or comparing/contrasting);

LA.8.LA.8.4.2.4: Reading and Language Arts

write a variety of informal communications (e.g., friendly letters, thank-you notes, messages) and formal communications (e.g., conventional business letters, invitations) that follow a format and that have a clearly stated purpose and that include the date, proper salutation, body, closing and signature; and

LA.9-10.LA.910.1.6.1: Reading and Language Arts

use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly;

LA.9-10.LA.910.1.6.2: Reading and Language Arts

listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text;

LA.9-10.LA.910.1.7.1: Reading and Language Arts

use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies (e.g., previewing, discussing, generating questions), text features, and text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection;

LA.9-10.LA.910.1.7.2: Reading and Language Arts

analyze the author?s purpose and/or perspective in a variety of text and understand how they affect meaning;

LA.9-10.LA.910.1.7.3: Reading and Language Arts

determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details;

LA.9-10.LA.910.2.2.2: Reading and Language Arts

use information from the text to answer questions or to state the main idea or provide relevant details;

LA.9-10.LA.910.2.2.3: Reading and Language Arts

organize information to show understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and events (e.g., representing key points within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing, contrasting, or outlining);

LA.9-10.LA.910.4.2.4: Reading and Language Arts

write a business letter and/or memo that presents information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience following a conventional format (e.g., block, modified block, memo, email);

LA.7-8.1.1.1: English Language Arts

interpret and analyze information from textbooks and nonfiction books for young adults, as well as reference materials, audio and media presentations, oral interviews, graphs, charts, diagrams, and electronic data bases intended for a general audience

LA.7-8.1.1.5: English Language Arts

relate new information to prior knowledge and experience

LA.7-8.1.2.3: English Language Arts

organize information according to an identifiable structure, such as compare/ contrast or general to specific

LA.7-8.1.2.4: English Language Arts

develop information with appropriate supporting material, such as facts, details, illustrative examples or anecdotes, and exclude extraneous material

LA.7-8.2.1.1: English Language Arts

read and view texts and performances from a wide range of authors, subjects, and genres

LA.7-8.2.2.1: English Language Arts

present responses to and interpretations of literature, making reference to the literary elements found in the text and connections with their personal knowledge and experience

LA.7-8.3.1.1: English Language Arts

analyze, interpret, and evaluate information, ideas, organization, and language from academic and nonacademic texts, such as textbooks, public documents, book and movie reviews, and editorials

LA.7-8.3.1.3: English Language Arts

understand that within any group there are many different points of view depending on the particular interests and values of the individual, and recognize those differences in perspective in texts and presentations (e.g., in considering whether to let a new industry come into a community, some community members might be enthusiastic about the additional jobs that will be created while others are concerned about the air and noise pollution that could result)

LA.7-8.4.1.2: English Language Arts

express ideas and concerns clearly and respectfully in conversations and group discussions

LA.7-8.4.1.4: English Language Arts

use verbal and nonverbal skills to improve communication with others

LA.7-8.4.2.1: English Language Arts

write social letters, cards, and electronic messages to friends, relatives, community acquaintances, and other electronic network users

LA.7-8.4.2.3: English Language Arts

read and discuss social communications and electronic communications of other writers and use some of the techniques of those writers in their own writing

SOC.7-8.1.2.3: Social Studies

understand the relationship between the relative importance of United States domestic and foreign policies over time

SOC.7-8.1.2.4: Social Studies

analyze the role played by the United States in international politics, past and present.

SOC.7-8.1.4.1: Social Studies

consider the sources of historic documents, narratives, or artifacts and evaluate their reliability

SOC.7-8.1.4.2: Social Studies

understand how different experiences, beliefs, values, traditions, and motives cause individuals and groups to interpret historic events and issues from different perspectives

SOC.7-8.1.4.4: Social Studies

describe historic events through the eyes and experiences of those who were there. (Taken from National Standards for History for Grades K-4)

SOC.7-8.2.1.3: Social Studies

interpret and analyze documents and artifacts related to significant developments and events in world history.

SOC.7-8.2.3.2: Social Studies

interpret and analyze documents and artifacts related to significant developments and events in world history

SOC.7-8.2.4.1: Social Studies

explain the literal meaning of a historical passage or primary source document, identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led up to these developments, and what consequences or outcomes followed (Taken from National Standards for World History)

SOC.7-8.2.4.3: Social Studies

view history through the eyes of those who witnessed key events and developments in world history by analyzing their literature, diary accounts, letters, artifacts, art, music, architectural drawings, and other documents
Curriki Rating
On a scale of 0 to 3
3
On a scale of 0 to 3

This resource was reviewed using the Curriki Review rubric and received an overall Curriki Review System rating of 3, as of 2008-06-25.

Component Ratings:

Technical Completeness: 3
Content Accuracy: 3
Appropriate Pedagogy: 3

Reviewer Comments:

This resource offers important background information and context to understanding The Diary of Anne Frank. The lesson plan is complete, easy to follow and the WebQuest is user friendly. The content of the lesson is rich, informative and thorough. It guides the user through a WebQuest with provocative, open-ended questions. Pedagogy is constructivist, reflects best practice, provides opportunities for scaffolding and higher order thinking, and uses multi-media.
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Kathleen Duhl
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