Type:

E-book, Lesson Plan

Description:

Students will use real archaeological data to create a scale model of Tikal Temple 1, a Mayan pyramid, using sugar cubes. Students will then set up and conduct a scientific experiment using their sugar cube models to investigate the process of erosion and its effects on archaeological sites.

Subjects:

  • Arts > General
  • Arts > Architecture
  • Arts > Technology
  • Educational Technology > General
  • Educational Technology > Integrating Technology into the Classroom
  • Educational Technology > Using Multimedia & the Internet
  • Information & Media Literacy > General
  • Information & Media Literacy > Research Methods
  • Mathematics > General
  • Mathematics > Applied Mathematics
  • Mathematics > Arithmetic
  • Mathematics > Estimation
  • Mathematics > Geometry
  • Mathematics > Measurement
  • Science > General
  • Science > Earth Science
  • Science > Engineering
  • Science > Geology
  • Science > Physical Sciences
  • Science > Technology
  • Social Studies > General
  • Social Studies > Anthropology
  • Social Studies > Geography
  • Social Studies > World History

Education Levels:

  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10

Keywords:

maya scale erosion archaeology technology pyramids history

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike
Update Standards?

SCI.5.4.A: Science

collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including calculators, microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, prisms, mirrors, pan balances, triple beam balances, spring scales, graduated cylinders, beakers, hot plates, meter sticks, magnets, collecting nets, and notebooks; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; and materials to support observations of habitats or organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and

SCI.6.2.E: Science

analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.

SCI.7.2.A: Science

plan and implement comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology;

SCI.7.2.D: Science

construct tables and graphs, using repeated trials and means, to organize data and identify patterns; and

SCI.7.2.E: Science

analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.

SCI.7.4.A: Science

use appropriate tools to collect, record, and analyze information, including life science models, hand lens, stereoscopes, microscopes, beakers, Petri dishes, microscope slides, graduated cylinders, test tubes, meter sticks, metric rulers, metric tape measures, timing devices, hot plates, balances, thermometers, calculators, water test kits, computers, temperature and pH probes, collecting nets, insect traps, globes, digital cameras, journals/notebooks, and other equipment as needed to teach the curriculum; and

SCI.8.2.A: Science

plan and implement comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology;

SCI.8.2.E: Science

analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.
Curriki Rating
On a scale of 0 to 3
3
On a scale of 0 to 3

This resource was reviewed using the Curriki Review rubric and received an overall Curriki Review System rating of 3, as of 2009-07-30.

Component Ratings:

Technical Completeness: 3
Content Accuracy: 3
Appropriate Pedagogy: 3

Reviewer Comments:

This lesson is part of the CyArk on-line lesson plans (http://archive.cyark.org/education-lesson-plans) and is appropriate for middle school students, although the activity can easily be adapted for use with various educational levels. Students will use real archaeological data to create a scale model of Tikal Temple 1, a Mayan pyramid, using sugar cubes, then simulate and investigate the process of erosion on archeological sites. The lesson includes clear learning objectives, materials needed, detailed procedures, and alignment with the California State standards. The included links are functional and support the lesson’s objectives. This lesson represents excellent integration of social science, investigative science and the use of technology.

Not Rated Yet.

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