Type:

Other

Description:

Arthur Kornberg in the 1970s. Not long after Arber's discoveries, Arthur Kornberg identified the pasting mechanism for DNA, an enzyme he called ligase. Kornberg was trying to construct artificial viral DNA from viral fragments, but had been unable to make a biologically active molecule. Once he added ligase, however, he found that the enzyme made it possible to paste the ends of DNA molecules together. With ligase, the viral DNA he created formed a continuous loop, just as it did in the original virus. The artificial viral DNA was indeed biologically active – it could reproduce on its own – and Kornberg was hailed as having "made life in a test tube."

Subjects:

    Education Levels:

      Keywords:

      History/Policy/Law,viral dna,test tube,NSDL,NSDL_SetSpec_BEN,dna molecules,molecule,virus,oai:nsdl.org:2200/20081106034210740T,Life Science,continuous loop,arthur kornberg,arber,1970s,image description,fragments,Chemistry,discoveries

      Language:

      English

      Access Privileges:

      Public - Available to anyone

      License Deed:

      Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike

      Collections:

      None
      This resource has not yet been aligned.
      Curriki Rating
      'NR' - This resource has not been rated
      NR
      'NR' - This resource has not been rated

      This resource has not yet been reviewed.

      Not Rated Yet.

      Non-profit Tax ID # 203478467