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Description:

“Caroline or Change” offers opportunities for connection. Two Louisiana families, the Gellman family and the Thibodeaux family are the “Everyman,” average, ordinary people moving through the day-to-day moments of their lives. “Caroline or Change” connects the day-to-day moments of these ordinary people to pivotal moments in United States history. These connections work to personalize and contextualize the social, cultural and political climates that serve as the backdrop for the play. This Study Companion expands these points of connection by providing opportunities for further consideration of both national and local events occurring during the time period depicted in “Caroline or Change.” In Background students trace how the national and local social, cultural and political climates of the 1960’s have continued to inform and lead to pivotal contemporary moments unfolding currently in United States history. This begins with personal reflections by playwright Tony Kushner about his inspiration for “Caroline or Change” and follows with timelines and news articles that both chronical and connect pivotal moments in United States history and New Orleans history with the prevailing social, cultural and political climates of the time. The Tony-nominated “Caroline, or Change” includes change... children, families and monuments. Family Portraits gives students opportunities to share stories about their family and learn about the cultures of their classmates, which may either be the same or different from their own, and create an autobiographical work of art to express what is special about the culture of their family. Children Who Changed the World, 1963 leads students on an exploration of how children were involved in the Civil Rights Movement and the Children’s Crusade of 1963. Children Who Changed the World, 2017 provides students with additional opportunities to explore how children have changed the world, during the Civil Rights Movement and in the modern day. Lake Charles, Louisiana is home to both the Gellman family and the Thibodeaux family. During Act One, In order to cheer her up, Caroline Thibodeaux’s friend Dotty tells Caroline that a group of teenagers took down a statue honoring a Confederate soldier from in front of the courthouse. Caroline doesn\'t know anything about it because she doesn\'t own a television. She isn\'t happy about the news, saying that it will only cause trouble. This story of the removal of the monument is woven throughout the rest of the play. In Reflections on Monuments students will have opportunities to explore the importance of monuments, why they are created, learn about the Paper Monuments Project and create their own monument. Monuments: Context and Creation give opportunities to further explore monuments as works of art and how monuments embrace the uniqueness of cultural and national identities and honor heritage, culture and national histories (NOTE: This lesson was originally created as part of a collection of arts lessons; additional lessons from this collection can be found here: https://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/library/k-12-arts-resources)

Subjects:

  • Mathematics > Algebra
  • Social Studies > Current Events
  • Mathematics > Equations
  • Mathematics > Geometry
  • Language Arts > Grammar, Usage & Mechanics
  • Social Studies > History/Local
  • Language Arts > Listening & Speaking
  • Language Arts > Literature
  • Mathematics > Number Sense & Operations
  • Mathematics > Patterns
  • Mathematics > Problem Solving
  • Language Arts > Reading Comprehension
  • Social Studies > Research
  • Social Studies > Sociology
  • Social Studies > State History
  • Language Arts > Story Telling
  • Social Studies > Thinking & Problem Solving
  • Social Studies > United States History
  • Language Arts > Vocabulary
  • Language Arts > Writing

Education Levels:

    Keywords:

    Language:

    English

    Access Privileges:

    Public - Available to anyone

    License Deed:

    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Update Standards?

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.2.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2b: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.8: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

    CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

    CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.4: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/"corners") and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).

    CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.5: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.

    CCSS.Math.Content.1.G.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.

    CCSS.Math.Content.3.G.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.
    Curriki Rating
    'P' - This is a trusted Partner resource
    P
    'P' - This is a trusted Partner resource
    member-name
    Janet Pinto
    February 26, 2019

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