Type:

Other

Description:

Students should develop self-reflection skills and appropriate views about knowledge and learning, both for their own sake and because these skills and views may be related to improvements in conceptual understanding. We explored the latter issue in the context of an introductory physics course for first-year engineering honors students. As part of the course, students submitted weekly reports, in which they reflected on how they learned specific physics content. The reports by 12 students were analyzed for the quality of reflection and some of the epistemological beliefs they exhibited. Students' conceptual learning gains were measured with standard survey instruments. We found that students with high conceptual gains tend to show reflection on learning that is more articulate and epistemologically sophisticated than students with lower conceptual gains. Some implications for instruction are suggested.

Subjects:

  • Education > General

Education Levels:

  • Grade 1
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9

Keywords:

oai:nsdl.org:2200/20061003063746548T,Undergraduate (Lower Division),Education,Assessment,NSDL,Undergraduate (Upper Division),General Physics,Student Characteristics,Physics,Higher Education,NSDL_SetSpec_439869,Vocational/Professional Development Education,Education Foundations,teaching,Physics Education Research,education,physics,Affect,Graduate/Professional

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike

Collections:

None
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