A collection of resources recommended for teaching a high school Economics course.

Learn Liberty Collection

by Learn Liberty
Learn Liberty is your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. We don’t have all the answers - but we’ve got a lot of ideas. By working with professors from a range of academic disciplines and letting them share their own opinions, we help you explore new ways of looking for solutions to the world’s problems.
Curriki RatingNR

Economic Progress

by Alexandria Lau
Students will analyze what it means to pursue economic progress by studying the core values, events and people in the United States starting from the Progressive Movement through the modern era. Students will discuss the Industrial Revolution, the Age of Imperialism and New Deal reforms.
Curriki RatingNR

Buying vs. Renting

by EconEdLink Website
Have you given any thought to where you will live when you are "on your own" - out in the world earning a living? You will have many decisions to make as you look for a place to call home. In this lesson, your basic economic decision making skills will be used to weigh the pros and cons of home ownership, and to analyze housing options. It's time to find out what is right for YOU.
Curriki RatingNR

Calculating Simple Interest

by EconEdLink Website
How do banks calculate the amount of interest paid on a loan? In this lesson, students will view a Livescribe Pencast to learn how to find the dollar amount in interest that is due at maturity. This lesson uses different time periods such as days, months, and years in the calculation as well as varying interest rates.
Curriki RatingNR

AP Microeconomics 2017

by Jennifer Steigerwald Massapequa School District
The Advanced Placement program offers a course and exam in Microeconomics to qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in Microeconomics. The material contained herein reflects the content of an introductory college course in Microeconomics. The Advanced placement examination is representative of such a course and is an appropriate measurement of skills and knowledge in Microeconomics.
Curriki RatingNR

In this Economics Made Easy video, we talk about the history from where we started to where we are today, because of the economic boom of wealth in our modern society.
Curriki RatingNR

Like the state and federal government, local governments offer tax incentives to businesses to help solve economic and/or environmental problems. In this lesson students will explore the web sites of three different cities and determine what incentives are offered and what problems they are trying to solve. They will also be asked to determine if the benefits gained from the incentives offset the costs incurred.
Curriki RatingNR

This year's federal elections will involve electing a president, all members of the House of Representatives, and one third of the Senate. Barring some international crisis, economic issues appear likely to dominate the debates. In past elections, macroeconomic issues related to the business cycle, such as problems of inflation, unemployment, and slow economic growth, were the main focus of debate. Because of the recent overall economic performance, current debate on these issues has been muted. In its place, debates concerning the distribution of wealth and income have come to the forefront.
Curriki RatingNR

Is Globalization a Dirty Word?

by EconEdLink Website
Is globalization a dirty word? Well not according to a recent study conducted by the World Bank. The report, entitled Globalization, Growth, and Poverty: Building an Inclusive World Economy, makes the case for globalization as a method for easing poverty in the world’s poor countries. What do you think? In this lesson you will access several types of information about the World Bank report, including a video file, a PowerPoint slide show, and a press release. Your objective is to determine the benefits of globalization and also to consider the costs of globalization.
Curriki RatingNR

Perhaps you have seen the catchy TV ads for the various branches of the United States military. You know, the ones that tell you to "be all you can be...in the Army!." In the last decade, these advertisements have become necessary because compulsory military service (otherwise known as "the draft") no longer exists in the United States. Compulsory service, long required during time of war, was reinstituted in the United States in 1940, as the United States was on the brink of World War II. The draft remained in effect through the turbulent 1960s but was suspended by President Nixon in 1973. In the late 1970s, Congress passed legislation officially halting the draft.
Curriki RatingNR

Non-profit Tax ID # 203478467