Type:

Other

Description:

When presented with a question, students activate a set of knowledge, or schema, that they use to respond to the question. For many instructors, one of the goals of the introductory physics course is to help students build robust schemas of formal knowledge that are activated for a given task. In this paper, we present evidence that suggests that even when schemas of formal knowledge are formed, students often struggle to activate this knowledge. We focus on the analysis of interviews with two introductory physics students concerning the topic of dynamics. We also demonstrate that the act of explaining, during the interview, has a profound impact on the students' responses.

Subjects:

  • Education > General

Education Levels:

  • Grade 1
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9

Keywords:

NSDL,oai:nsdl.org:2200/20061003065358318T,Education Foundations,Undergraduate (Lower Division),Physics Education Research,General Physics,Graduate/Professional,Life Science,Higher Education,PERC 2003,Cognition,student experiments,Physics,classical mechanics,human factors,educational courses,Ecology, Forestry and Agriculture,NSDL_SetSpec_439869,Vocational/Professional Development Education,Education,Technology,Geoscience

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike

Collections:

None
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