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BBC News: John Barry talks about his memories working in cinemahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-12323565David Arnold pays tribute to 'governor' John Barryhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-12324183Cutting Edge Tries New Model for Film Music [Free registration may be required]http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/31/business/media/31score.html?ref=todayspaperFilm Score Monthlyhttp://www.filmscoremonthly.com/daily/index.cfmJohn Barry Interviewhttp://www.runmovies.eu/index.php?view=article&catid=35%3Ainterviews&id=80%3Ajohn-barry-interview&option=com_content&Itemid=55As a young boy, John Barry helped work at his father's chain of movie theaters in England, and years later he would become one of the movie industry's most celebrated film composers. Many filmgoers know him best for his work scoring many of the James Bond films. This Sunday, Barry passed away in New York, and he is remembered as a composer who could work deftly with the requirements of a blockbuster-style action movie (a la the Bond films) and more subtle period films, such as "The Lion in Winter" and romantic fantasy films, like "Somewhere in Time". Barry started out his musical career with a jazz combo in 1957, and he then he teamed up with singer Adam Faith to score a few pop hits, including "Poor Me". Barry started his career as a film composer by scoring "Never Let Go", a 1960 film starring Peter Sellers. His relationship with the Bond films began with "Dr. No" in 1962 and continued until 1987's "The Living Daylights". During his long career, Barry won five Oscars for his compositions, including those for "Born Free" in 1966 and "Out of Africa" in 1985.The first link will take users to an obituary for John Barry which appeared in this Monday's Telegraph. The second link leads to a revealing clip of Barry talking about his earliest memories of his father's cinema and the time he spent there. Moving on, the third link whisks users away to a tribute from David Arnold, who was mentored by Barry in his own musical career. The fourth link leads to a thoughtful piece from this Monday's New York Times about a rather intriguing development in the way that music for films is distributed, purchased, and so on. Movie score buffs will love the fifth link, which leads to the homepage of Film Score Monthly. Here they can check out newly issued soundtracks, classic scores, and read commentaries on a range of subjects related to the world of film music composing. The final link leads to a great interview with Barry that originally appeared in Soundtrack Magazine in 1996.

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  • Arts > General
  • Arts > Film
  • Arts > Music
  • Social Studies > General

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