Type:

Interactive, Full Course, Graphic Organizer/Worksheet, Lesson Plan

Description:

A collection of a full course, lesson plans, worksheets and labs on Forensic Science.

Subjects:

  • Science > General

Education Levels:

  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10
  • Grade 11
  • Grade 12

Keywords:

collections Forensic science

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

Collections:

None
Update Standards?

SCI.9-12.L.1.1.1.a: Science

Scientific explanations are built by combining evidence that can be observed with what people already know about the world.

SCI.9-12.L.1.1.2.a: Science

Inquiry involves asking questions and locating, interpreting, and processing information from a variety of sources.

SCI.9-12.L.1.1.2.b: Science

Inquiry involves making judgments about the reliability of the source and relevance of information.

SCI.9-12.L.1.1.3.a: Science

Scientific explanations are accepted when they are consistent with experimental and observational evidence and when they lead to accurate predictions.

SCI.9-12.L.1.1.3.b: Science

All scientific explanations are tentative and subject to change or improvement. Each new bit of evidence can create more questions than it answers. This leads to increasingly better understanding of how things work in the living world.

SCI.9-12.L.1.1.4.a: Science

Well-accepted theories are ones that are supported by different kinds of scientific investigations often involving the contributions of individuals from different disciplines.

SCI.9-12.L.1.2.1: Science

Devise ways of making observations to test proposed explanations.

SCI.9-12.L.1.3.4.a: Science

Hypotheses are valuable, even if they turn out not to be true, because they may lead to further investigation.

SCI.9-12.L.1.3.4.b: Science

Claims should be questioned if the data are based on samples that are very small, biased, or inadequately controlled or if the conclusions are based on the faulty, incomplete, or misleading use of numbers.

SCI.9-12.L.1.3.4.c: Science

Claims should be questioned if fact and opinion are intermingled, if adequate evidence is not cited, or if the conclusions do not follow logically from the evidence given.

SCI.9-12.L.4.2.1.b: Science

Every organism requires a set of coded instructions for specifying its traits. For offspring to resemble their parents, there must be a reliable way to transfer information from one generation to the next. Heredity is the passage of these instructions from one generation to another.

SCI.9-12.L.4.2.1.c: Science

Hereditary information is contained in genes, located in the chromosomes of each cell. An inherited trait of an individual can be determined by one or by many genes, and a single gene can influence more than one trait. A human cell contains many thousands of different genes in its nucleus.

SCI.9-12.L.4.2.1.f: Science

In all organisms, the coded instructions for specifying the characteristics of the organism are carried in DNA, a large molecule formed from subunits arranged in a sequence with bases of four kinds (represented by A, G, C, and T). The chemical and structural properties of DNA are the basis for how the genetic information that underlies heredity is both encoded in genes (as a string of molecular "bases") and replicated by means of a template.

SCI.9-12.L.4.2.2.c: Science

Different enzymes can be used to cut, copy, and move segments of DNA. Characteristics produced by the segments of DNA may be expressed when these segments are inserted into new organisms, such as bacteria.
Curriki Rating
'NR' - This resource has not been rated
NR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated

This resource has not yet been reviewed.

Not Rated Yet.

Non-profit Tax ID # 203478467