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Guys and Dolls JR is a JPAS Theatre Kids! production. The JPAS Theatre Kids! program gives children year-round opportunities to participate in theatre, experience the process of putting on a show, as well as learning basic acting techniques and skills. Enrollment is by auditions which are held prior to each show. Theatre Kids! activities give young people a chance to have fun with theatre, creating a lifelong love of the arts. JPAS Theatre Kids! proudly presents 2 musicals per season performed by an all kid cast. Theatre Kids! welcomes children 7-12 years old who want to learn more about theatre and dramatic arts. Guys and Dolls is subtitled, “A Musical Fable of Broadway.” Set in Damon Runyon’s mythical New York, Guys and Dolls creates an idealized version of New York in which the diverse population of this vast city, including hardened criminals and puritanical evangelists, are magically able to come together, get along, and even fall in love. Runyon was mostly a short story writer, and it was producers Cy Feuer and Ernest Martin who first had the idea to string together Runyon’s shorter tales into a full-length musical. Some of the stories drawn upon most heavily include “The Idyll of Sarah Brown” and “Blood Pressure,” but sources for certain characters and elements of the story can be found throughout Runyon’s work. This Study Companion provides opportunities to reflect on “Guys and Dolls” and other writing by Damon Runyon from many different angles. Damon Runyon was known for his details, his style of narration, and his approach to crafting characters. Runyon wrote his famed stories based on the colorful characters he observed, always describing the small details and perspectives, a style that other reporters did not use. He wrote using Historical Present, using verbs in the present tense to describe the past. His characters had colorful names like Cheesecake Ike or Nicely Nicely Johnson. They were often fatalistic. And they spoke in vernacular, vocabulary particular to a region or group of people. Damon Runyon: Creating Characters in the Historical Present expands on students’ understanding of the Historical Present and character development through the creation of a descriptive essay written in the style of “Guys and Dolls” author Damon Runyon. Damon Runyon’s New York, Our New Orleans moves from writing students’ created in Damon Runyon: Creating Characters in the Historical Present to explore setting “the city,” as a character in and of itself. Students will have an opportunity to develop a second descriptive essay written in the style of “Guys and Dolls” author Damon Runyon. Set Design: Measurement, Estimation, Fractions and Ratios begins with images of the set design for the JPAS production of “Guys and Dolls.” Students will investigate the inspiration behind this set design—New York’s Manhattan in the 1930’s and consider architecture in its simplest terms—shapes students already know how to identify (rectangles, squares and triangles.) Students will also delve into New Orleans architecture (AND be introduced to words such as “estimation,” “measurement,” “unit,” “length,” “fraction,” “ratio,” “ color wheel,” “primary color,” “secondary color,” “complementary color” and “analogous color.”) Additionally, once students have investigated the shapes incorporated into the JPAS set design and the shapes incorporated into local New Orleans architecture, they will have an opportunity to create their own inspired architectural designs. A Few Other Ideas…provide even more opportunities to reflect on the math that can be found in Runyon’s world of “Guys and Dolls.” At the beginning of “Guys and Dolls,” Nathan Detroit tries to think up a bet to place with Sky Masterson that he cannot loose, a bet about food. Nathan wants to make a bet with Sky about a popular restaurant: what does it sell more of, cheesecake or strudel? Nathan has instructed his boys to get the lowdown on how much cheesecake and how much strudel is sold at a popular restaurant. With the advance information, Nathan attempts to sucker Sky into a bet for $1000. Explore cheesecake and strudel in New Orleans. Make a cheesecake (and explore more math related to estimation and measurement.) Dig even deeper--Guys and Dolls JR. opens with a bustling street scene alive with Times Square, New York characters. Some gamblers enter and trade tips about different horses that they are considering placing bets on from the daily scratch sheet (\"Fugue for Tinhorns\"). As the gamblers finish their pitch, Miss Sarah Brown and the Mission Band enter, playing a hymn (\"Follow the Fold\"). She warns the gamblers of the evils of their ways, but her sermon falls on deaf ears, so she and the band exit dejectedly. Lt. Brannigan, of the New York Police Department, enters and warns the gamblers not to try to organize their crap game. Nathan enters and, after Brannigan exits, complains that there is nowhere for the crap game to take place unless he can come up with $1000 to rent the Biltmore Garage. Craps is a game where players take turns rolling dice. Gamblers make bets on the probability that a specific event will occur—that when they roll the dice, and the dice come to a stop, the number will equal a specific number—the number they predict. Explore the math behind gambling—probability and statistics. Probability is the ratio of the number of outcomes in the total number of possible outcomes. Ratios can be used many ways: as a way to combine elements to make something new (as in mixing paint and glue to create printer’s ink,) as a way to describe a group (the ratio of boys to girls in a class,) OR as a way to predict the number of outcomes in a coin toss.

Subjects:

  • Mathematics > Algebra
  • Mathematics > Equations
  • Mathematics > Estimation
  • Social Studies > Geography
  • Language Arts > Grammar, Usage & Mechanics
  • Social Studies > History/Local
  • Language Arts > Listening & Speaking
  • Language Arts > Literature
  • Mathematics > Number Sense & Operations
  • Mathematics > Patterns
  • Mathematics > Problem Solving
  • Language Arts > Reading Comprehension
  • Language Arts > Research
  • Social Studies > Research
  • Social Studies > State History
  • Mathematics > Statistics
  • Language Arts > Story Telling
  • Social Studies > Thinking & Problem Solving
  • Language Arts > Vocabulary
  • Language Arts > Writing

Education Levels:

    Keywords:

    Language:

    English

    Access Privileges:

    Public - Available to anyone

    License Deed:

    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Update Standards?

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.2.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.2a: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

    Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.

    CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

    CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.B.4: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Generate measurement data by measuring lengths using rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch. Show the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units— whole numbers, halves, or quarters.

    CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

    CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems.

    CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

    CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.

    CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.5: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.

    CCSS.Math.Content.1.G.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.

    CCSS.Math.Content.1.G.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.

    CCSS.Math.Content.3.G.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.

    CCSS.Math.Content.6.SP.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers.

    CCSS.Math.Content.6.SP.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Understand that a set of data collected to answer a statistical question has a distribution which can be described by its center, spread, and overall shape.

    CCSS.Math.Content.7.SP.C.5: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Understand that the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1 that expresses the likelihood of the event occurring. Larger numbers indicate greater likelihood. A probability near 0 indicates an unlikely event, a probability around 1/2 indicates an event that is neither unlikely nor likely, and a probability near 1 indicates a likely event.
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    Janet Pinto
    February 26, 2019

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