Type:

Interactive, Assessment, Graphic Organizer/Worksheet, Other, Manual

Description:

A series of six presentatations that look at the origins of The First World War. Each presentation is created using Lodestar Learning.

Subjects:

  • Social Studies > General
  • Social Studies > World History
  • Education > General

Education Levels:

  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10
  • Grade 11
  • Grade 12

Keywords:

First World War War Conflict Origins of War Origins

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Update Standards?

SOC.7-8.1.1.1: Social Studies

explore the meaning of American culture by identifying the key ideas, beliefs, and patterns of behavior, and traditions that help define it and unite all Americans

SOC.7-8.1.1.2: Social Studies

interpret the ideas, values, and beliefs contained in the Declaration of Independence and the New York State Constitution and United States Constitution, Bill of Rights, and other important historical documents.

SOC.7-8.1.2.1: Social Studies

describe the reasons for periodizing history in different ways

SOC.7-8.1.2.2: Social Studies

investigate key turning points in New York State and United States history and explain why these events or developments are significant

SOC.7-8.1.2.3: Social Studies

understand the relationship between the relative importance of United States domestic and foreign policies over time

SOC.7-8.1.2.4: Social Studies

analyze the role played by the United States in international politics, past and present.

SOC.7-8.1.3.1: Social Studies

complete well-documented and historically accurate case studies about individuals and groups who represent different ethnic, national, and religious groups, including Native American Indians, in New York State and the United States at different times and in different locations

SOC.7-8.1.3.2: Social Studies

gather and organize information about the important achievements and contributions of individuals and groups living in New York State and the United States

SOC.7-8.1.3.3: Social Studies

describe how ordinary people and famous historic figures in the local community, State, and the United States have advanced the fundamental democratic values, beliefs, and traditions expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the New York State and United States Constitutions, the Bill of Rights, and other important historic documents

SOC.7-8.1.3.4: Social Studies

classify major developments into categories such as social, political, economic, geographic, technological, scientific, cultural, or religious.

SOC.7-8.1.4.1: Social Studies

consider the sources of historic documents, narratives, or artifacts and evaluate their reliability

SOC.7-8.1.4.2: Social Studies

understand how different experiences, beliefs, values, traditions, and motives cause individuals and groups to interpret historic events and issues from different perspectives

SOC.7-8.1.4.3: Social Studies

compare and contrast different interpretations of key events and issues in New York State and United States history and explain reasons for these different accounts

SOC.7-8.1.4.4: Social Studies

describe historic events through the eyes and experiences of those who were there. (Taken from National Standards for History for Grades K-4)

SOC.7-8.2.1.1: Social Studies

know the social and economic characteristics, such as customs, traditions, child-rearing practices, ways of making a living, education and socialization practices, gender roles, foods, and religious and spiritual beliefs that distinguish different cultures and civilizations

SOC.7-8.2.1.2: Social Studies

know some important historic events and developments of past civilizations

SOC.7-8.2.1.3: Social Studies

interpret and analyze documents and artifacts related to significant developments and events in world history.

SOC.7-8.2.2.1: Social Studies

develop timelines by placing important events and developments in world history in their correct chronological order

SOC.7-8.2.2.2: Social Studies

measure time periods by years, decades, centuries, and millennia

SOC.7-8.2.2.3: Social Studies

study about major turning points in world history by investigating the causes and other factors that brought about change and the results of these changes.

SOC.7-8.2.3.1: Social Studies

investigate the roles and contributions of individuals and groups in relation to key social, political, cultural, and religious practices throughout world history

SOC.7-8.2.3.2: Social Studies

interpret and analyze documents and artifacts related to significant developments and events in world history

SOC.7-8.2.3.3: Social Studies

classify historic information according to the type of activity or practice: social/cultural, political, economic, geographic, scientific, technological, and historic.

SOC.7-8.2.4.1: Social Studies

explain the literal meaning of a historical passage or primary source document, identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led up to these developments, and what consequences or outcomes followed (Taken from National Standards for World History)

SOC.7-8.2.4.2: Social Studies

analyze different interpretations of important events and themes in world history and explain the various frames of reference expressed by different historians

SOC.7-8.2.4.3: Social Studies

view history through the eyes of those who witnessed key events and developments in world history by analyzing their literature, diary accounts, letters, artifacts, art, music, architectural drawings, and other documents

SOC.7-8.2.4.4: Social Studies

investigate important events and developments in world history by posing analytical questions, selecting relevant data, distinguishing fact from opinion, hypothesizing cause-and-effect relationships, testing these hypotheses, and forming conclusions.

SOC.7-8.3.1.1: Social Studies

map information about people, places, and environments

SOC.7-8.3.1.2: Social Studies

understand the characteristics, functions, and applications of maps, globes, aerial and other photographs, satellite-produced images, and models (Taken from National Geography Standards, 1994)

SOC.7-8.3.1.3: Social Studies

investigate why people and places are located where they are located and what patterns can be perceived in these locations

SOC.7-8.3.1.4: Social Studies

describe the relationships between people and environments and the connections between people and places.

SOC.7-8.3.2.1: Social Studies

formulate geographic questions and define geographic issues and problems

SOC.7-8.3.2.2: Social Studies

use a number of research skills (e.g., computer databases, periodicals, census reports, maps, standard reference works, interviews, surveys) to locate and gather geographical information about issues and problems (Adapted from National Geography Standards, 1994)

SOC.7-8.3.2.3: Social Studies

present geographic information in a variety of formats, including maps, tables, graphs, charts, diagrams, and computer-generated models

SOC.7-8.3.2.4: Social Studies

interpret geographic information by synthesizing data and developing conclusions and generalizations about geographic issues and problems.

SOC.7-8.4.1.1: Social Studies

explain how societies and nations attempt to satisfy their basic needs and wants by utilizing scarce capital, natural, and human resources

SOC.7-8.4.1.2: Social Studies

define basic economic concepts such as scarcity, supply and demand, markets, opportunity costs, resources, productivity, economic growth, and systems

SOC.7-8.4.1.3: Social Studies

understand how scarcity requires people and nations to make choices which involve costs and future considerations

SOC.7-8.4.1.4: Social Studies

understand how people in the United States and throughout the world are both producers and consumers of goods and services

SOC.7-8.4.1.5: Social Studies

investigate how people in the United States and throughout the world answer the three fundamental economic questions and solve basic economic problems

SOC.7-8.4.1.6: Social Studies

describe how traditional, command, market, and mixed economies answer the three fundamental economic questions

SOC.7-8.4.1.7: Social Studies

explain how nations throughout the world have joined with one another to promote economic development and growth.

SOC.7-8.4.2.1: Social Studies

identify and collect economic information from standard reference works, newspapers, periodicals, computer databases, textbooks, and other primary and secondary sources

SOC.7-8.4.2.2: Social Studies

organize and classify economic information by distinguishing relevant from irrelevant information, placing ideas in chronological order, and selecting appropriate labels for data

SOC.7-8.4.2.3: Social Studies

evaluate economic data by differentiating fact from opinion and identifying frames of reference

SOC.7-8.4.2.4: Social Studies

develop conclusions about economic issues and problems by creating broad statements which summarize findings and solutions

SOC.7-8.4.2.5: Social Studies

present economic information by using media and other appropriate visuals such as tables, charts, and graphs to communicate ideas and conclusions.

SOC.7-8.5.1.1: Social Studies

analyze how the values of a nation affect the guarantee of human rights and make provisions for human needs

SOC.7-8.5.1.2: Social Studies

consider the nature and evolution of constitutional democracies

SOC.7-8.5.1.3: Social Studies

explore the rights of citizens in other parts of the hemisphere and determine how they are similar to and different from the rights of American citizens

SOC.7-8.5.1.4: Social Studies

analyze the sources of a nation's values as embodied in its constitution, statutes, and important court cases.

SOC.7-8.5.2.1: Social Studies

understand how civic values reflected in United States and New York State Constitutions have been implemented through laws and practices

SOC.7-8.5.2.2: Social Studies

understand that the New York State Constitution, along with a number of other documents, served as a model for the development of the United States Constitution

SOC.7-8.5.2.3: Social Studies

compare and contrast the development and evolution of the constitutions of the United States and New York State

SOC.7-8.5.2.4: Social Studies

define federalism and describe the powers granted the the national and state governments by the United States Constitution

SOC.7-8.5.2.5: Social Studies

value the principles, ideals, and core values of the American democratic system based upon the premises of human dignity, liberty, justice, and equality

SOC.7-8.5.2.6: Social Studies

understand how the United States and New York State Constitutions support majority rule but also protect the rights of the minority.

SOC.7-8.5.3.1: Social Studies

explain what citizenship means in a democratic society, how citizenship is defined in the Constitution and other laws of the land, and how the definition of citizenship has changed in the United States and New York State over time

SOC.7-8.5.3.2: Social Studies

understand that the American legal and political systems guarantee and protect the rights of citizens and assume that citizens will hold and exercise certain civic values and fulfill certain civic responsibilities

SOC.7-8.5.3.3: Social Studies

discuss the role of an informed citizen in today's changing world

SOC.7-8.5.3.4: Social Studies

explain how Americans are citizens of their states and of the United States.

SOC.7-8.5.4.1: Social Studies

respect the rights of others in discussions and classroom debates regardless of whether or not one agrees with their viewpoint

SOC.7-8.5.4.2: Social Studies

explain the role that civility plays in promoting effective citizenship in preserving democracy

SOC.7-8.5.4.3: Social Studies

participate in negotiation and compromise to resolve classroom, school, and community disagreements and problems.
Curriki Rating
On a scale of 0 to 3
3
On a scale of 0 to 3

This resource was reviewed using the Curriki Review rubric and received an overall Curriki Review System rating of 3, as of 2012-11-26.

Component Ratings:

Technical Completeness: 3
Content Accuracy: 3
Appropriate Pedagogy: 0

Reviewer Comments:

This resource is a collection of Lodestar presentations that cover information about the origins of World War I. Content covered includes pre-World War I treaties and key events that contributed to the start of the war. In addition to the content, there are two interactive review activities that can be directly accessed by students. The presentations can easily be integrated into a World War unit either to reinforce teacher lectures or for students to use directly.

Not Rated Yet.

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