Type:

Lesson Plan

Description:

Exploring the Virtue of Justice, defined as standing for equally applied rules and making sure everyone obeys them. The lesson looks at the life of Jourdon Anderson, an escaped slave who wrote a letter to his former master in 1865. The Lesson explores two central questions: How can I seek justice on behalf of another person? On behalf of myself?

Subjects:

  • Social Studies > Civics
  • Social Studies > United States History

Education Levels:

  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10
  • Grade 11
  • Grade 12

Keywords:

Civic Virtue Civic Virtue, Slavery Civil War

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Update Standards?

D2.Civ.10.3-5: College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards

Identify the beliefs, experiences, perspectives, and values that underlie their own and others' points of view about civic issues.

D2.Civ.8.9-12: College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards

Evaluate social and political systems in different contexts, times, and places, that promote civic virtues and enact democratic principles.

D2.Civ.12.9-12: College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards

Analyze how people use and challenge local, state, national, and international laws to address a variety of public issues.

D2.Civ.14.9-12: College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards

Analyze historical, contemporary, and emerging means of changing societies, promoting the common good, and protecting rights.

D2.His.4.3-5: College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards

Explain why individuals and groups during the same historical period differed in their perspectives.
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'P' - This is a trusted Partner resource

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