Lesson 18: IMPERATIVE

The imperative is very simple. Just use the base form of the verb (Lesson 14). We do not usually write or say the subject of an imperative sentence, but we understand it is 'you' (singular or plural).

Form

AFFIRMATIVE AND NEGATIVE EXAMPLES:

AFFIRMATIVE:
Come

here!
Be quiet!
Heat the milk.

NEGATIVE:
Do not feed
the animals.
Don't be angry!
Do not overheat.


Some uses

An imperative sentence means that we want someone to do, or not to do, something.

WRITTEN SIGNS AND NOTICES

EXAMPLES:
REDUCE
SPEED NOW (a road sign)
KEEP OFF THE GRASS (in a park)
DO NOT LEAN OUT OF THE WINDOW (on a train)
FASTEN SEAT BELTS (on a plane)

INSTRUCTIONS

EXAMPLES:
Bake
for thirty minutes. Do not overcook.
Turn
right at the traffic lights and then take the second turn on the left.

COMMANDS

EXAMPLE: Wake up! It's half past eight.

REMINDERS

EXAMPLE: Don't forget the book tomorrow.

FRIENDLY EXPRESSIONS

EXAMPLES:
Come
in and sit down! [welcoming]
Have a seat! [offering]
Let's have a break now. [suggesting]
Don't worry! [sympathizing]

Be careful! [warning]
Have a good trip! [saying goodbye]
Take care of yourselves. [saying goodbye]
Have a nice weekend! [saying goodbye]

NOTICE: To be polite, add please to the end of the sentence:

EXAMPLES:
Wait a minute, please.
Fasten your seat belts, please.

NOTICE: To show that you want something very much, put do or please at the beginning of the sentence:

EXAMPLES:
Do
show me!
Please tell me!
Do let's go!
Please be careful!

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