Type:

Lesson Plan, Manual

Description:

Lesson plans focusing on politics, political parties and election campaigns. Students will be able to differentiate between political parties and why the party party system is functioning in our country. Also included are a few videos and internet links.

Subjects:

  • Social Studies > General
  • Social Studies > Civics
  • Social Studies > Current Events
  • Social Studies > Global Awareness
  • Social Studies > Government
  • Social Studies > Political Systems
  • Social Studies > United States Government
  • Social Studies > United States History

Education Levels:

  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10
  • Grade 11
  • Grade 12
  • Higher Education
  • Graduate
  • Undergraduate-Upper Division
  • Undergraduate-Lower Division

Keywords:

collections political parties elections republican democrat party vote voting media politics grassroots campaign debates platform

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

Collections:

None
Update Standards?

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:1.1: History and Social Science

Asking relevant and focusing questions that will lead to independent research based on what they have seen, what they have read, what they have listened to, and/or what they have researched (e.g., How will global warming affect me and my community? Does intolerance exist in my school or community?).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:2.1: History and Social Science

Using prior knowledge, relevant questions, and facts to develop a prediction and/or propose an explanation or solution.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:3.1: History and Social Science

Identifying the quality and quantity of information needed, including primary and secondary sources.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:3.2: History and Social Science

Identifying tools, tasks, and procedures needed for conducting an inquiry, including a plan for citing sources.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:3.3: History and Social Science

Determining possible ways to present data (e.g., Power- Point, hypercard, report, graph, etc.).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:4.1: History and Social Science

Referring to and following a plan for an inquiry.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:4.2: History and Social Science

Locating relevant materials such as print, electronic, and human resources.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:4.3: History and Social Science

Applying criteria from the research plan to analyze the quality (e.g., credibility of a web site) and quantity (e.g., minimum number of sources) of information gathered.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:4.4: History and Social Science

Describing evidence and recording observations using notecards, videotape, tape recorders, journals, or databases. (e.g., recording relevant details of a historical or geographical landmark).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:4.5: History and Social Science

Citing sources.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:5.1: History and Social Science

Organizing and displaying information in a manner appropriate to the research statement through tables graphs, maps, dioramas, charts, narratives, posters, timelines, models, simulations, and/or dramatizations.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:5.2: History and Social Science

Determining the validity and reliability of the document or information (e.g., evaluating why an author's point of view affects the reliability of the source).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:5.3: History and Social Science

Using appropriate methods for interpreting information, such as comparing and contrasting, summarizing, illustrating, sequencing, and/or justifying (e.g., identifying ethnic or cultural perspectives missing from a historical account).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:5.4: History and Social Science

Revising explanations as necessary based on peer critique, expert opinion, etc.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:6.1: History and Social Science

Explaining the relevance of their findings (So what?) to themselves, their community, and/or history (e.g., by asking follow-up questions, by proposing additional research).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:6.2: History and Social Science

Explaining how their research has led to a clearer understanding of an issue or idea.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:6.3: History and Social Science

Proposing solutions to problems based on their findings, and asking additional questions.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:6.4: History and Social Science

Identifying what was easy or difficult about following the research plan, and making suggestions for improvement.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:7.1: History and Social Science

Developing and giving oral, written, or visual presentations for various audiences.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:7.2: History and Social Science

Soliciting and responding to feedback.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:7.3: History and Social Science

Pointing out possibilities for continued or further research.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.1: History and Social Science

Describing and defining the rights, principles, and responsibilities of citizenship in the U.S. (e.g., the right to vote and the responsibility to obey the law).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.2: History and Social Science

Giving examples of ways people act as members of a global community (e.g., purchasing products made in other countries).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.3: History and Social Science

Demonstrating positive interaction with group members (e.g., participating in a service project).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.4: History and Social Science

Identifying problems and proposing solutions in the local community, state, nation, or world.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.5: History and Social Science

Explaining their own point of view on issues that affect themselves and society; being able to explain an opposing point of view (e.g. bullies, victims, witnesses; voting age; smoking; violence on TV).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.6: History and Social Science

Giving examples of ways in which political parties, campaigns, and elections provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.7: History and Social Science

Illustrating how individuals and groups have brought about change locally, nationally, or internationally (e.g., interview members of an advocacy group).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.8: History and Social Science

Describing how an American's identity stems from beliefs in and allegiance to shared political values and principles, and how these are similar and different to other peoples.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:14.9: History and Social Science

Establishing rules and/or policies for a group, school, and/or community, and defending them.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:15.1: History and Social Science

Describing how rules and laws are created (e.g., participating in a simulation about creating a new law).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:15.2: History and Social Science

Identifying key documents on which U.S. laws are based and where to find them (e.g., Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights, U.S. Constitution).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:15.3: History and Social Science

Describing how government decisions impact and/or relate to their lives.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:15.4: History and Social Science

Identifying the basic functions, structures and purposes of governments within the United States.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:15.5: History and Social Science

Describing the basic principles of American democracy (e.g., right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; responsibility for the common good; equality of opportunity and equal protection of the law; freedom of speech and religion).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:15.6: History and Social Science

Defining criteria for selecting leaders at the school, community, state, national and international levels.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:1.1: History and Social Science

Asking focusing and probing questions that will lead to independent research and incorporate concepts of personal, community, or global relevance (e.g., What are the causes of low voter turnout? What are the most effective ways to improve voter participation?).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:2.1: History and Social Science

Predicting results, proposing a choice about a possible action, or exploring relationships between facts and/or concepts.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:3.1: History and Social Science

Identifying the quality and quantity of information needed, including primary and secondary sources.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:3.2: History and Social Science

Identifying tools and procedures needed for collecting, managing, and examining information, including a plan for citing sources (e.g., establishing a time line or schedule for research, identifying places to find possible sources).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:3.3: History and Social Science

Determining possible ways to present data (e.g., Power- Point, hypercard, report, graph, etc.).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:4.1: History and Social Science

Referring to and following a detailed plan for an inquiry.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:4.2: History and Social Science

Locating relevant materials such as print, electronic, and human resources.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:4.3: History and Social Science

Applying criteria from the plan to analyze the quality and quantity of information gathered (e.g., judging the accuracy of different accounts of the same event).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:4.4: History and Social Science

Describing evidence and recording observations using notecards, videotape, tape recorders, journals, or databases.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:4.5: History and Social Science

Revising the research plan and locating additional materials and/or information, as needed.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:4.6: History and Social Science

Citing sources.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:5.1: History and Social Science

Organizing and display information in a manner appropriate to the research statement through tables graphs, maps, dioramas, charts, narratives, posters timelines, models, simulations, and/or dramatizations.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:5.2: History and Social Science

Determining the validity and reliability of the document or information.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:5.3: History and Social Science

Choosing and using appropriate methods for interpreting information, such as comparing and contrasting, summarizing, illustrating, generalizing, sequencing, synthesizing, analyzing, and/or justifying (e.g., analyzing information to determine why two historical accounts of the same event might differ.)

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:5.4: History and Social Science

Revising explanations as necessary based on personal reflection, peer critique, expert opinion, etc.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:6.1: History and Social Science

Formulating recommendations and/or making decisions based on evidence.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:6.2: History and Social Science

Using their research results to support or refute the original research statement.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:6.3: History and Social Science

Proposing solutions to problems based on their findings, and asking additional questions.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:6.4: History and Social Science

Identifying problems or flaws with the research plan and suggesting improvements (e.g., identifying additional types of information that could strengthen an investigation).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:6.5: History and Social Science

Proposing further investigations.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:7.1: History and Social Science

Developing and giving oral, written, or visual presentations for various audiences.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:7.2: History and Social Science

Soliciting and responding to feedback.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:7.3: History and Social Science

Pointing out possibilities for continued or further research.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.1: History and Social Science

Comparing the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in another country to those of the U.S (e.g., after reading accounts of elections in news articles, compare voting rights).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.2: History and Social Science

Identifying the various ways people become citizens of the U.S. (e.g., birth, naturalization).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.3: History and Social Science

Giving examples of ways people act as members of a global community (e.g., collecting used textbooks for countries in need).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.4: History and Social Science

Demonstrating positive interaction with group members (e.g., working with a group to design a lesson teaching younger students about rights and responsibilities).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.5: History and Social Science

Identifying problems, proposing solutions, and considering the effects of a course of action in the local community, state, nation, or world.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.6: History and Social Science

Explaining and defending their own point of view on issues that affect themselves and society, using information gained from reputable sources (e.g. communism vs. democracy; war vs. economic sanctions).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.7: History and Social Science

Explaining and critically evaluating views that are not one's own.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.8: History and Social Science

Giving examples of ways in which political parties, campaigns, and elections provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.9: History and Social Science

Illustrating how individuals and groups have brought about change locally, nationally, or internationally (e.g., interview someone involved in civil union legislation).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.10: History and Social Science

Demonstrating how identity stems from beliefs in and allegiance to shared political values and principles, and how these are similar and different to other peoples (e.g. Northern Ireland/Republic; socialism; capitalism).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:14.11: History and Social Science

Establishing rules and/or policies for a group, school, or community, and defending them (e.g., dress code policies, establishing a skate board park).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:15.1: History and Social Science

Describing how rules and laws are created (e.g., participating in a simulation about creating a new law).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:15.2: History and Social Science

Identifying key documents on which U.S. laws are based and where to find them (e.g., Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights, U.S. Constitution).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:15.3: History and Social Science

Describing how government decisions impact and/or relate to their lives.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:15.4: History and Social Science

Identifying the basic functions, structures and purposes of governments within the United States.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:15.5: History and Social Science

Describing the basic principles of American democracy (e.g., right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; responsibility for the common good; equality of opportunity and equal protection of the law; freedom of speech and religion).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:15.6: History and Social Science

Defining criteria for selecting leaders at the school, community, state, national and international levels.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:1.1: History and Social Science

Asking focusing, probing, and significant research questions that incorporate ideas and concepts of personal, community, or global relevance (e.g., How will recent changes in the global economy affect my community and me?).

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:1.1: History and Social Science

Asking focusing, probing, and significant research questions that incorporate ideas and concepts of personal, community, or global relevance and could lead to answers which allow students to become participants in solutions (Does my purchasing behavior affect child labor practices in the developing world?).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:2.1: History and Social Science

Predicting results, proposing a choice about a possible action, or interpreting relationships between facts and/or concepts.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:2.1: History and Social Science

Predicting results, proposing choices about possible actions, or interpreting relationships between facts and/or concepts.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:3.1: History and Social Science

Establishing criteria for the quality and quantity of information needed, including primary and secondary sources.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:3.2: History and Social Science

Identifying tools and procedures needed for collecting, managing, and analyzing information, including a plan for citing sources (e.g., establishing a time line or schedule for research, independently identifying places to find sources).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:3.3: History and Social Science

Determining the best ways to present their data (e.g., Power- Point, hypercard, report, graph, etc.).

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:3.1: History and Social Science

Establishing criteria for the quality and quantity of information needed, including primary and secondary sources.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:3.2: History and Social Science

Identifying tools and procedures needed for collecting, managing, and analyzing data, including a plan for citing sources (e.g., establishing a time line or schedule for research, independently identifying places to find sources).

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:3.3: History and Social Science

Determining the best ways to present their data (e.g., PowerPoint, hypercard, report, graph, etc.).

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:3.4: History and Social Science

Determining ways research plan can be applied to other areas (e.g., to future career goals).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:4.1: History and Social Science

Referring to and following a detailed plan for a complex inquiry (e.g., conduct an inquiry into the several causes of WWI).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:4.2: History and Social Science

Locating relevant materials such as print, electronic, and human resources.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:4.3: History and Social Science

Applying criteria from the plan to analyze the quality and quantity of and corroborate the information gathered (e.g., citing multiple sources to verify evidence).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:4.4: History and Social Science

Describing evidence and recording observations using notecards, videotape, tape recorders, journals, or databases.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:4.5: History and Social Science

Revising research plan and locating additional materials and/or information, as needed.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:4.6: History and Social Science

Citing sources.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:5.1: History and Social Science

Organizing and displaying information in a manner appropriate to the research statement through maps, graphs, charts, tables, narratives, timelines, models, simulations, or dramatizations (e.g., creating a line graph from tabular data in order to convey economic trends).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:5.2: History and Social Science

Determining the validity and reliability of the document or information in relation to an analysis of the hypothesis (e.g., "How good is my hypothesis based on the reliable information I've gathered?").

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:5.3: History and Social Science

Choosing and using appropriate methods for interpreting information, such as comparing and contrasting, summarizing, illustrating, generalizing, sequencing, synthesizing, analyzing, inferring, deducing, and/or justifying.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:5.4: History and Social Science

Revising explanation as necessary based on personal reflection, peer critique, expert opinion, etc.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:6.1: History and Social Science

Predicting and/or recommending how conclusions can be applied to other civic, economic or social issues.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:6.2: History and Social Science

Using research results to support or refute the original research statement.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:6.3: History and Social Science

Proposing solutions to problems based on findings, and asking additional questions.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:6.4: History and Social Science

Identifying problems or flaws with the research process and suggesting improvements (e.g., evaluating the limitations of some sources).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:6.5: History and Social Science

Proposing further investigations.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:7.1: History and Social Science

Developing and giving oral, written, or visual presentations for various audiences.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:7.2: History and Social Science

Soliciting and responding to feedback.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-10:7.3: History and Social Science

Pointing out possibilities for continued or further research.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:4.1: History and Social Science

Referring to and following a detailed plan for a complex inquiry (e.g., conduct an inquiry into the several causes of WWI).

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:4.2: History and Social Science

Locating relevant materials such as print, electronic, and human resources.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:4.3: History and Social Science

Applying criteria from the plan to analyze the quality and quantity of and corroborate the information gathered (e.g., judging the accuracy of historical fiction by comparing the characters and events described with accounts in multiple primary and secondary sources).

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:4.4: History and Social Science

Describing evidence and recording observations using notecards, videotape, tape recorders, journals, or databases.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:4.5: History and Social Science

Revising research plan and locating additional materials and/or information, as needed.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:4.6: History and Social Science

Citing sources.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:5.1: History and Social Science

Organizing and displaying information in a manner appropriate to the research statement through maps, graphs, charts, tables, narratives, timelines, models, simulations, or dramatizations.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:5.2: History and Social Science

Determining the validity and reliability of the document or information in relation to an analysis of the hypothesis.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:5.3: History and Social Science

Choosing and using appropriate methods for interpreting information, such as comparing and contrasting, summarizing, illustrating, generalizing, sequencing, synthesizing, analyzing, inferring, deducing, and/or justifying.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:5.4: History and Social Science

Revising explanation as necessary based on personal reflection, peer critique, expert opinion, etc.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:6.1: History and Social Science

Predicting and/or recommending how conclusions can be applied to other civic, economic or social issues.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:6.2: History and Social Science

Using research results to support or refute the original research statement.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:6.3: History and Social Science

Proposing solutions to problems based on findings, and asking additional questions.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:6.4: History and Social Science

Identifying problems or flaws with the research process and suggesting improvements.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:6.5: History and Social Science

Proposing further investigations.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:7.1: History and Social Science

Developing and giving presentations for various audiences.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:7.2: History and Social Science

Soliciting and responding to feedback.

SOC.9-12.H&SS11-12:7.3: History and Social Science

Pointing out possibilities for continued or further research.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.1: History and Social Science

Analyzing and evaluating changes in the interpretation of rights and responsibilities of citizenship over time (e.g., changes in voting age, changes in voting rights for women and African Americans).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.2: History and Social Science

Analyzing and evaluating the issues related to and criteria for U.S. citizenship, past and present (e.g., analyzing the issues surrounding Japanese citizens during WWII).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.3: History and Social Science

Discussing why people want to become citizens of the U.S. and/or another country (e.g., Why did Americans emigrate to the Soviet Union during the Depression?).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.4: History and Social Science

Analyzing impacts of people's actions as members of a global community (e.g., the Kyoto Agreement).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.5: History and Social Science

Demonstrating positive interaction with group members (e.g., working with a group to draft legislation).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.6: History and Social Science

Identifying problems, proposing solutions, considering the effects of and implementing a course of action in the local community, state, nation, or world.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.7: History and Social Science

Explaining and defending one's own point of view on issues that affect themselves and society, using information gained from reputable sources (e.g. stem cell research, health care issues, federal budget allocations).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.8: History and Social Science

Explaining, critically evaluating, and defending views that are not one's own.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.9: History and Social Science

Analyze ways in which political parties, campaigns, and elections encourage and discourage citizens to participate in the political process (e.g., voter registration drives, use of the Internet, negative campaign ads).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.10: History and Social Science

Illustrating how individuals and groups have brought about change locally, nationally, or internationally (e.g., research the far-reaching effects of Mohandas Ghandi's beliefs and actions).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.11: History and Social Science

Analyzing how identity stems from beliefs in and allegiance to shared political values and principles, and how these are similar and different to other peoples (e.g. nation building in regions with disparate cultures).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:14.12: History and Social Science

Establishing rules and/or policies for a group, school, or community, and defending them (e.g., senior privileges, curfews).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:15.1: History and Social Science

Evaluating how and why rules and laws are created, interpreted, and changed (e.g., evaluating recent decisions by the U.N.).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:15.2: History and Social Science

Analyzing the principles in key U.S. and international documents and how they apply to their own lives (e.g., Patriot Act, Universal Declaration of Human Rights).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:15.3: History and Social Science

Describing how government decisions impact citizens locally, nationally, and internationally.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:15.4: History and Social Science

Comparing and evaluating the basic functions, structures and purposes of governments, both past and present (e.g., democracy vs. dictatorship, internal and external protection).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:15.5: History and Social Science

Identifying and debating issues surrounding the basic principles of American democracy (e.g., individual rights vs. common good, majority rule vs. protection of minority rights).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:15.6: History and Social Science

Defining and analyzing the process for selecting leaders at state, national and international levels (e.g., analyzing pros and cons of the primary process; debating the necessity of the electoral college).
Curriki Rating
On a scale of 0 to 3
3
On a scale of 0 to 3

This resource was reviewed using the Curriki Review rubric and received an overall Curriki Review System rating of 3, as of 2013-03-29.

Component Ratings:

Technical Completeness: 3
Content Accuracy: 3
Appropriate Pedagogy: 0

Reviewer Comments:

This resource is a collection of 13 grammar worksheets and English as a Second Language handouts. Subject areas are: Noun, pronoun, verb; regular and irregular verb tenses; Spanish action commands; “to be,” “to have,” etc. There are lots of practice sheets and activities that can be used as quiz or test. These worksheets are immediately usable, useful and easily accessible.

Not Rated Yet.

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