Type:

Other

Description:

Different radioisotopes have different half-lives. However, with few exceptions, the only radioisotopes found in the natural world are those with long half-lives ranging from millions to billions of years.In 1947 the chemist Willard Frank Libby developed carbon-14 dating techniques leading to his Nobel Prize (1960). Carbon-14 dating is especially popular with anthropoligists seeking to date the age of bones. There are many other examples.In the medical sciences, radioisotopes with short half-lives decay so rapidly that detection - imaging - is difficult. At the same time, the quality of rapid decay may be highly desirable for both diagnosis and therapy, e.g., chemotherapy. Clearly this is an important research topic.

Subjects:

    Education Levels:

      Keywords:

      oai:nsdl.org:2200/20111219102013936T,History/Policy/Law,National Curve Bank,NSDL_SetSpec_ncs-NSDL-COLLECTION-000-003-111-981,NSDL

      Language:

      Access Privileges:

      Public - Available to anyone

      License Deed:

      Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike

      Collections:

      None
      This resource has not yet been aligned.
      Curriki Rating
      'NR' - This resource has not been rated
      NR
      'NR' - This resource has not been rated

      This resource has not yet been reviewed.

      Not Rated Yet.

      Non-profit Tax ID # 203478467