Type:

Other

Description:

This New York Times article details two skulls, one from central Africa and the other from the Black Sea republic of Georgia, that "have shaken the human family tree to its roots, sending scientists scrambling to see if their favorite theories are among the fallen fruit." The article discusses how the two skulls have caused scientists to rethink not only how we conceive of human evolution and its chain of events, but even the geography of evolution and migration patterns of very early humans.

Subjects:

  • Science > General
  • Social Studies > General
  • Social Studies > Geography
  • Social Studies > Anthropology

Education Levels:

  • Grade 1
  • Grade 2
  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10
  • Grade 11
  • Grade 12

Keywords:

Science -- Biological and life sciences,NSDL_SetSpec_ncs-NSDL-COLLECTION-000-003-112-021,Higher Education,NSDL,Social studies -- Anthropology,Undergraduate (Upper Division),Technical Education (Lower Division),Science,Undergraduate (Lower Division),Geoscience,Life Science,oai:nsdl.org:2200/20110201175751419T,High School,General Public,Vocational/Professional Development Education,Social studies,Social studies -- Geography,Informal Education,Social Sciences,Technical Education (Upper Division)

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike

Collections:

None
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