Type:

Interactive, Article/Essay, Curriculum, Lesson Plan, Manual

Description:

A collection of maps, websites, simulations, videos, and lessons to teach Social Studies concepts.

Subjects:

  • Social Studies > General

Education Levels:

  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10
  • Grade 11
  • Grade 12

Keywords:

collections social studies simulations

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

Collections:

None
Update Standards?

SOC.3.3.1: History and Social Science

The student will explain how the contributions of ancient Greece and Rome have influenced the present world in terms of architecture, government (direct and representative democracy), and sports.

SOC.3.3.2: History and Social Science

The student will study the early West African empire of Mali by describing its oral tradition (storytelling), government (kings), and economic development (trade).

SOC.3.3.3.a: History and Social Science

describing the accomplishments of Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de Leon, Jacques Cartier, and Christopher Newport;

SOC.3.3.3.b: History and Social Science

identifying reasons for exploring, the information gained, and the results from the travels.

SOC.3.3.4.a: History and Social Science

locating Greece, Rome, and West Africa;

SOC.3.3.4.b: History and Social Science

describing the physical and human characteristics of Greece, Rome, and West Africa;

SOC.3.3.4.c: History and Social Science

explaining how the people of Greece, Rome, and West Africa adapted to and/or changed their environment to meet their needs.

SOC.3.3.5.a: History and Social Science

positioning and labeling the seven continents and four oceans to create a world map;

SOC.3.3.5.b: History and Social Science

using the equator and prime meridian to identify the four hemispheres;

SOC.3.3.5.c: History and Social Science

locating the countries of Spain, England, and France;

SOC.3.3.5.d: History and Social Science

locating the regions in the Americas explored by Christopher Columbus (San Salvador in the Bahamas), Juan Ponce de Leon (near St. Augustine, Florida), Jacques Cartier (near Quebec, Canada), and Christopher Newport (Jamestown, Virginia);

SOC.3.3.5.e: History and Social Science

locating specific places on a simple letter-number grid system.

SOC.3.3.6: History and Social Science

The student will interpret geographic information from maps, tables, graphs, and charts.

SOC.3.3.7: History and Social Science

The student will explain how producers use natural resources (water, soil, wood, and coal), human resources (people at work), and capital resources (machines, tools, and buildings) to produce goods and services for consumers.

SOC.3.3.8: History and Social Science

The student will recognize the concepts of specialization (being an expert in one job, product, or service) and interdependence (depending on others) in the production of goods and services (in ancient Greece, Rome, the West African empire of Mali, and in the present).

SOC.3.3.9: History and Social Science

The student will identify examples of making an economic choice and will explain the idea of opportunity cost (what is given up when making a choice).

SOC.3.3.10.a: History and Social Science

explaining the purpose of rules and laws;

SOC.3.3.10.b: History and Social Science

explaining that the basic purposes of government are to make laws, carry out laws, and decide if laws have been broken;

SOC.3.3.10.c: History and Social Science

explaining that government protects the rights and property of individuals.

SOC.3.3.11.a: History and Social Science

describing the individual rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; and equality under the law;

SOC.3.3.11.b: History and Social Science

identifying the contributions of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Rosa Parks, Thurgood Marshall, and Martin Luther King, Jr.;

SOC.3.3.11.c: History and Social Science

recognizing that Veterans Day and Memorial Day honor people who have served to protect the country's freedoms.

SOC.3.3.12: History and Social Science

The student will recognize that Americans are a people of diverse ethnic origins, customs, and traditions, who are united by the basic principles of a republican form of government and respect for individual rights and freedoms.

SOC.4-5.VS.2.a: History and Social Science

locating Virginia and its bordering states on maps of the United States;

SOC.4-5.VS.2.b: History and Social Science

locating and describing Virginia's Coastal Plain (Tidewater), Piedmont, Blue Ridge Mountains, Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau;

SOC.4-5.VS.2.c: History and Social Science

locating and identifying water features important to the early history of Virginia (Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake Bay, James River, York River, Potomac River, and Rappahannock River);

SOC.4-5.VS.2.d: History and Social Science

locating three American Indian (First American) language groups (the Algonquian, the Siouan, and the Iroquoian) on a map of Virginia;

SOC.4-5.VS.2.e: History and Social Science

describing how American Indians (First Americans) adapted to the climate and their environment to secure food, clothing, and shelter.

SOC.4-5.VS.3.a: History and Social Science

explaining the reasons for English colonization;

SOC.4-5.VS.3.b: History and Social Science

describing how geography influenced the decision to settle at Jamestown;

SOC.4-5.VS.3.c: History and Social Science

identifying the importance of the charters of the Virginia Company of London in establishing the Jamestown settlement;

SOC.4-5.VS.3.d: History and Social Science

identifying the importance of the Virginia Assembly (1619) as the first representative legislative body in English America;

SOC.4-5.VS.3.e: History and Social Science

identifying the importance of the arrival of Africans and women to the Jamestown settlement;

SOC.4-5.VS.3.f: History and Social Science

describing the hardships faced by settlers at Jamestown and the changes that took place to ensure survival;

SOC.4-5.VS.3.g: History and Social Science

describing the interactions between the English settlers and the Powhatan people, including the contributions of the Powhatans to the survival of the settlers.

SOC.4-5.VS.4.a: History and Social Science

explaining the importance of agriculture and its influence on the institution of slavery;

SOC.4-5.VS.4.b: History and Social Science

describing how European (English, Scotch-Irish, German) immigrants, Africans, and American Indians (First Americans) influenced the cultural landscape and changed the relationship between the Virginia colony and England;

SOC.4-5.VS.4.c: History and Social Science

explaining how geography influenced the relocation of Virginia's capital from Jamestown to Williamsburg to Richmond;

SOC.4-5.VS.4.d: History and Social Science

describing how money, barter, and credit were used.

SOC.4-5.VS.5.a: History and Social Science

identifying the reasons why the colonies went to war with England as expressed in the Declaration of Independence;

SOC.4-5.VS.5.b: History and Social Science

identifying the various roles played by Virginians in the Revolutionary War era, with emphasis on George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Patrick Henry;

SOC.4-5.VS.5.c: History and Social Science

identifying the importance of the American victory at Yorktown.

SOC.4-5.VS.6.a: History and Social Science

explaining why George Washington is called the "Father of our Country" and James Madison is called the "Father of the Constitution";

SOC.4-5.VS.6.b: History and Social Science

identifying the ideas of George Mason and Thomas Jefferson as expressed in the Virginia Declaration of Rights and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom;

SOC.4-5.VS.6.c: History and Social Science

explaining the influence of geography on the migration of Virginians into western territories.

SOC.5-6.USI.2.a: History and Social Science

locate the seven continents;

SOC.5-6.USI.2.b: History and Social Science

locate and describe the location of the geographic regions of North America: Coastal Plain, Appalachian Mountains, Canadian Shield, Interior Lowlands, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, Basin and Range, and Coastal Range;

SOC.5-6.USI.2.c: History and Social Science

locate and identify the water features important to the early history of the United States: Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico.

SOC.5-6.USI.3.a: History and Social Science

locating where the American Indians (First Americans) settled, with emphasis on Arctic (Inuit), Northwest (Kwakiutl), Plains (Sioux), Southwest (Pueblo), and Eastern Woodland (Iroquois);

SOC.5-6.USI.3.b: History and Social Science

describing how the American Indians (First Americans) used their environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter.

SOC.5-6.USI.4.a: History and Social Science

describing the motivations, obstacles, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, Portuguese, and English explorations;

SOC.5-6.USI.4.b: History and Social Science

describing cultural interactions between Europeans and American Indians (First Americans) that led to cooperation and conflict;

SOC.5-6.USI.4.c: History and Social Science

identifying the location and describing the characteristics of West African societies (Ghana, Mali, and Songhai) and their interactions with traders.

SOC.5-6.USI.5.a: History and Social Science

describing the religious and economic events and conditions that led to the colonization of America;

SOC.5-6.USI.5.b: History and Social Science

comparing and contrasting life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies, with emphasis on how people interacted with their environment;

SOC.5-6.USI.5.c: History and Social Science

describing colonial life in America from the perspectives of large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants, and slaves;

SOC.5-6.USI.5.d: History and Social Science

identifying the political and economic relationships between the colonies and England.

SOC.5-6.USI.6.a: History and Social Science

identifying the issues of dissatisfaction that led to the American Revolution;

SOC.5-6.USI.6.b: History and Social Science

identifying how political ideas shaped the revolutionary movement in America and led to the Declaration of Independence, with emphasis on the ideas of John Locke;

SOC.5-6.USI.6.c: History and Social Science

describing key events and the roles of key individuals in the American Revolution, with emphasis on George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and Thomas Paine;

SOC.5-6.USI.6.d: History and Social Science

explaining reasons why the colonies were able to defeat Britain.

SOC.5-6.USI.7.a: History and Social Science

identifying the weaknesses of the government established by the Articles of Confederation;

SOC.5-6.USI.7.b: History and Social Science

identifying the basic principles of the new government established by the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights;

SOC.5-6.USI.7.c: History and Social Science

identifying the conflicts that resulted in the emergence of two political parties;

SOC.5-6.USI.7.d: History and Social Science

describing the major accomplishments of the first five presidents of the United States.

SOC.5-6.USI.8.a: History and Social Science

describing territorial expansion and how it affected the political map of the United States, with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California;

SOC.5-6.USI.8.b: History and Social Science

identifying the geographic and economic factors that influenced the westward movement of settlers;

SOC.5-6.USI.8.c: History and Social Science

describing the impact of inventions, including the cotton gin, the reaper, the steamboat, and the steam locomotive, on life in America;

SOC.5-6.USI.8.d: History and Social Science

identifying the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.

SOC.6-7.USII.2.a: History and Social Science

explaining how physical features and climate influenced the movement of people westward;

SOC.6-7.USII.2.b: History and Social Science

explaining relationships among natural resources, transportation, and industrial development after 1877;

SOC.6-7.USII.2.c: History and Social Science

locating the 50 states and the cities most significant to the historical development of the United States.

SOC.6-7.USII.3.a: History and Social Science

identifying the reasons for westward expansion;

SOC.6-7.USII.3.b: History and Social Science

explaining the reasons for the increase in immigration, growth of cities, new inventions, and challenges arising from this expansion;

SOC.6-7.USII.3.c: History and Social Science

describing racial segregation, the rise of "Jim Crow," and other constraints faced by African Americans in the post-Reconstruction South;

SOC.6-7.USII.3.d: History and Social Science

explaining the rise of big business, the growth of industry, and life on American farms;

SOC.6-7.USII.3.e: History and Social Science

describing the impact of the Progressive Movement on child labor, working conditions, the rise of organized labor, women's suffrage, and the temperance movement.

SOC.6-7.USII.4.a: History and Social Science

explaining the reasons for and results of the Spanish-American War;

SOC.6-7.USII.4.b: History and Social Science

explaining the reasons for the United States' involvement in World War I and its leadership role at the conclusion of the war.

SOC.6-7.USII.5.a: History and Social Science

explaining how developments in transportation (including the use of the automobile), communication, and electrification changed American life;

SOC.6-7.USII.5.b: History and Social Science

describing the social changes that took place, including Prohibition, and the Great Migration north;

SOC.6-7.USII.5.c: History and Social Science

examining art, literature, and music from the 1920s and 1930s, emphasizing Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington, and Georgia O'Keeffe and including the Harlem Renaissance;

SOC.6-7.USII.5.d: History and Social Science

identifying the causes of the Great Depression, its impact on Americans, and the major features of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal.

SOC.6-7.USII.6.a: History and Social Science

identifying the causes and events that led to American involvement in the war, including the attack on Pearl Harbor;

SOC.6-7.USII.6.b: History and Social Science

describing the major events and turning points of the war in Europe and the Pacific;

SOC.6-7.USII.6.c: History and Social Science

describing the impact of World War II on the homefront.

SOC.6-7.USII.7.a: History and Social Science

describing the rebuilding of Europe and Japan after World War II, the emergence of the United States as a superpower, and the establishment of the United Nations;

SOC.6-7.USII.7.b: History and Social Science

describing the conversion from a wartime to a peacetime economy;

SOC.6-7.USII.7.c: History and Social Science

identifying the role of America's military and veterans in defending freedom during the Cold War, including the wars in Korea and Vietnam, the Cuban missile crisis, the collapse of communism in Europe, and the rise of new challenges;

SOC.6-7.USII.7.d: History and Social Science

describing the changing patterns of society, including expanded educational and economic opportunities for military veterans, women, and minorities.

SOC.6-7.USII.8.a: History and Social Science

examining the Civil Rights Movement and the changing role of women;

SOC.6-7.USII.8.b: History and Social Science

describing the development of new technologies and their impact on American life.

SOC.9-12.GOVT.5.a: History and Social Science

explaining the relationship of the state governments to the national government;

SOC.9-12.GOVT.5.b: History and Social Science

describing the extent to which power is shared;

SOC.9-12.GOVT.5.c: History and Social Science

identifying the powers denied state and national governments;

SOC.9-12.GOVT.5.d: History and Social Science

examining the ongoing debate that focuses on the balance of power between state and national governments.

SOC.9-12.GOVT.7.a: History and Social Science

examining the legislative, executive, and judicial branches;

SOC.9-12.GOVT.7.b: History and Social Science

analyzing the relationship between the three branches in a system of checks and balances.

SOC.9-12.GOVT.8.a: History and Social Science

examining the legislative, executive, and judicial branches;

SOC.9-12.GOVT.8.b: History and Social Science

examining the structure and powers of local governments: county, city, and town;

SOC.9-12.GOVT.8.c: History and Social Science

analyzing the relationship among state and local governments.
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