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Description:

The musical The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a retelling of Victor Hugo’s epic story of love. In both Victor Hugo’s novel and the musical adapted from the novel, characters form opinions about other characters based on appearance. As an example, because Quasimodo has a deformity, some characters view him as a monster or evil; the name Quasimodo means “half formed.” As another example, because the gypsies are wanderers and street performers, some other characters view them as vermin. In Character Traits: What Makes a Man students will discuss the definitions of character (both the persona in a novel or musical and the attributes or personal qualities of the persona,) brain storm about character traits, analyze images of two characters, Quasimodo the bell ringer and Frollo Archdeacon of Notre Dame Cathedral, share opinions about these characters’ personal traits (based only on the character’s physical appearance,) review a description of both characters from the musical and investigate how these descriptions compare to opinions based only on appearance. The Towers of Notre Dame familiarizes students with the physical place that inspired Victor Hugo, Disney animators and Set Designer Adam Koch: Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France. Growing up in Paris, Victor Hugo fell in love with gothic architecture and with Notre Dame in particular. The first three chapters of his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame are devoted to describing gothic architecture of his time in great detail. When Disney was adapting Hugo’s novel into an animated movie, Disney animators traveled to Paris to research the building design of Notre Dame in order to develop imagery for the film. Notre Dame additionally inspired Adam Koch, Set Designer for the Ogunquit Playhouse production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame. JPAS will be using the Ogunquit Playhouse set for our Production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Students will have the opportunity to use Notre Dame as inspiration while they work in teams, architect and builder, to construct their own tower of Notre Dame. To do this, students will examine Notre Dame Cathedral towers and gargoyles, read an excerpt from Victor Hugo’s novel, read an interview with The Hunchback of Notre Dame Set Designer Adam Koch, review concepts in multiplication, division, area and perimeter and work collaboratively to build a small replica of the top of one of the towers. In preschool, students learn about shapes. They learn how to identify them by appearance. As an example, a shape made of straight lines with four equal sides is a square, a shape made of three straight lines is a triangle, a shape made of straight lines where the sides opposite each other (parallel) are equal is a rectangle and so forth. Rose windows, like the one in Notre Dame Cathedral, are based on a shape, the circle . In this lesson, we will expand on students’ understanding of shapes, specifically circles, and measurement by exploring them through the lens of an actual place, Notre Dame in Paris, and investigating the many ways this place was used as inspiration for storytelling, local architecture and set designs. Stained Glass: Telling Stories in Pieces is another lesson that familiarizes students with the physical place that inspired Victor Hugo, Disney animators and Set Designer Adam Koch: Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France. Students will investigate the rose 5 | P a g e window of Notre Dame, stained glass and rose windows in local New Orleans architecture and use these investigations to create their own rose windows. To do this, students will learn about stained glass and the history of the rose window in architecture, examine the rose window of Notre Dame, read an excerpt from Victor Hugo’s novel, read an interview with The Hunchback of Notre Dame Set Designer Adam Koch, learn about French influences in local New Orleans stained glass, view images of local New Orleans architecture that includes rose windows, review information on symmetry, radius, circumference, diameter and sectors, and use all this information to create their own rose window. Describe Your Favorite Place guides students as they explore how the power of personal voice in writing can be used to shape public opinion. To do this, students investigate Victor Hugo’s novel, the place that inspired it (Notre Dame Cathedral) and have the opportunity to think about their favorite place. Students will read articles about Victor Hugo’s inspiration, read an excerpt from Victor Hugo’s novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame, review how to write good descriptions and then create their own writing about a favorite place of theirs.

Subjects:

  • Mathematics > Algebra
  • Mathematics > Applied Mathematics
  • Mathematics > Equations
  • Mathematics > Estimation
  • Mathematics > Geometry
  • Social Studies > Global Awareness
  • Social Studies > History/Local
  • Language Arts > Listening & Speaking
  • Language Arts > Literature
  • Mathematics > Measurement
  • Mathematics > Patterns
  • Social Studies > Political Systems
  • Mathematics > Problem Solving
  • Language Arts > Reading Comprehension
  • Language Arts > Research
  • Language Arts > Story Telling
  • Social Studies > Thinking & Problem Solving
  • Language Arts > Vocabulary
  • Social Studies > World History
  • Language Arts > Writing

Education Levels:

  • Grade 1
  • Grade 2
  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10

Keywords:

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Update Standards?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each.

CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.5: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.

CCSS.Math.Content.1.G.A.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.

CCSS.Math.Content.2.G.A.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.G.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole.

CCSS.Math.Content.7.G.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Solve problems involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including computing actual lengths and areas from a scale drawing and reproducing a scale drawing at a different scale.

CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.B.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Solve multi-step real-life and mathematical problems posed with positive and negative rational numbers in any form (whole numbers, fractions, and decimals), using tools strategically. Apply properties of operations to calculate with numbers in any form; convert between forms as appropriate; and assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies.
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'P' - This is a trusted Partner resource
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Janet Pinto
February 26, 2019

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