Type:

Other

Description:

This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section presented with a traditional lecture served as the control group. A pretest/posttest assessment and a survey were administered to both sections and used in data analysis. In addition, overall test scores and item analysis were examined. The analysis revealed that participants in both groups improved significantly from pretest to posttest, but there were no significant differences between the groups in posttest scores. Neither group showed a significant change from posttest to the exam. However, there was a moderate positive effect on engagement and satisfaction survey questions from being in the study group (based on 255 total surveys returned by both groups). The role-play activity was at least as effective as the lecture in terms of student performance on the above-mentioned assessments. In addition, it proved successful in engaging students in the learning process and increasing their satisfaction.

Subjects:

  • Education > General

Education Levels:

    Keywords:

    Education,NSDL,NSDL_SetSpec_BEN,Career,Human anatomy,Teacher-centered/traditional instruction,Life Science,oai:nsdl.org:2200/20110607195106131T,Protein,Tutorial or self-directed instruction,Physiology,Student-centered instruction

    Language:

    English

    Access Privileges:

    Public - Available to anyone

    License Deed:

    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike

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    Non-profit Tax ID # 203478467