IN COLLECTION

Overview: This unit will introduce students to magnets. It will provide an overview of what a magnet is, what kinds of objects are magnetic, and how magnets are used in everyday life. Students will participate in hands-on activities, using the scientific process to discover answers to their questions about magnets.

 

Second Grade Curricula: Magnets is a piece of the overall second grade science curricula. Students will build on previous knowledge of the scientific procedure, specifically focusing on (1) Making predictions; (2) Conducting and experiment as a means of answering a specific question; (3) Recording results; and (4) Discussing and organizing conclusions. Becoming familiar with the scientific process is the key component of this unit, helping to better prepare students for future endeavors such as Science Fair Competition.

 

Unit Plan: This unit is a series of hands-on experiments, each one designed to allow students to investigate a specific attribute of a magnet. Every experiment is organized as follows: (1) Students receive clear directions to work with a partner or in a small group; (2) Students use an experiment guide to follow the experiment and record results; (3) Students discuss or record conclusions. At the end of the unit students will make a real life application by constructing and using a magnetic compass.

 

I.                     What do We Know About Magnets?

a.       Students discuss prior knowledge and use a KWL Chart to organize information.

b.       Allow 20-25 minutes for instruction time.

 

II.                    Are You Magnetic? (Part 1)

a.       Students will test a series of twelve objects to determine which objects attract a magnet and which do not.

b.       Allow 30-35 minutes for instruction time.

 

III.                  Are You Magnetic? (Part 2)

a.       Students will categorize objects from the previous lesson to discover the attributes of a magnetic object.

b.       Allow 20-25 minutes for instruction time.

 

IV.                  Magnetic Force Field

a.       Students will test the varying strengths of a magnetic force field on different sized objects.

b.       Allow 25-30 minutes for instruction time.

 

V.                   The Strength of  Magnet

a.       Students will test the varying strengths of different sized magnets.

b.       Allow 25-30 minutes for instruction time.

 

VI.                  Exploring Magnetic Poles (Part 1)

a.       Students will test north pole and south pole to discover that like poles repel and unlike poles attract.

b.       Allow 20-25 minutes for instruction time.

 

VII.                Exploring Magnetic Poles (Part 2)

a.       Students will explain vocabulary terms “attract” and “repel”, and students will write a conclusion about magnetic poles.

b.       Allow 15-20 minutes for instruction time.

 

VIII.               The Power of Magnets

a.       Students will test eight objects to discover when magnetic force can penetrate the object and when it cannot.

b.       Allow 35-40 minutes for instruction time.

 

IX.                  Making a Magnetic Compass

a.       Students will create a compass to further understand how magnets fit into everyday life.

b.       Allow 30-35 minutes for instruction time.

 

X.                   Compass Treasure Hunt

a.       Students will apply their knowledge of magnets in a real life setting.

b.       Allow 25-30 minutes for instruction time.

 

XI.                  Unit Review and Final Evaluation

a.       Students will review all major unit concepts and have a comprehensive summative evaluation.

b.       Allow 30 minutes for assessment.

 

Best Practices:

·          Organize Materials and Give Clear Instructions:

Ø       Use bins to have group sets of materials ready to hand out to students. Each bin should contain everything that a group needs to successfully complete the experiment.

Ø       Give clear instructions for each and every task. If students are required to move around the room, make sure they know to push chairs in, walk in a straight line, etc. No task is too small to assign it a specific procedure.

·          Assign Jobs to Group Members:

Ø       Give group members a specific procedure for carrying out experiments. For example, tell groups members, “You are number one and you are number two. Number one will do this task first, while number two does this.”

Ø       Assign specific jobs when necessary, such as Student A will hold the magnet while Student B will hold the object. Be as specific as possible.

·          Allow Adequate time for Exploration:

Ø       Put materials in front of students and give them three to five minutes to explore before beginning the experiment.

Ø       Ask guiding questions, such as “What do you notice about your materials? How are they alike? How are they different?”

 

Standards:

National Science Education Standards

NS.K-4.1 Science as Inquiry – As a result of the activities in Grades K-4, all students should develop:

·          Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry

·          Understanding about scientific inquiry

NS.K-4.2 Physical Science– As a result of the activities in Grades K-4, all students should develop an understanding of:

·          Properties of objects and materials

·          Light, heat, electricity, and magnetism

NS.K-4.7 History of Nature and Science– As a result of activities in Grades K-4, all students should develop understanding of:

·          Science as a human endeavor

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