Type:

Article/Essay, Diagram/Illustration/Map, Fiction, Non-Fiction, Readings/Excerpts, Curriculum, Graphic Organizer/Worksheet, Lesson Plan, Table/Graph/Chart, Vocabulary

Description:

Adapted from the film of the same, this heartwarming musical features seventeen Irving Berlin songs and a book by David Ives and Paul Blake. Veterans Bob Wallace and Phil Davis have a successful song-and-dance act after World War II. With romance in mind, the two follow a duo of beautiful singing sisters en route to their Christmas show at a Vermont lodge, which just happens to be owned by Bob and Phil\'s former army commander. The dazzling score features well known standards including Blue Skies, I Love A Piano, How Deep Is the Ocean and the perennial favorite, White Christmas. An uplifting musical great for the Holiday Season! The musical stage adaptation of White Christmas premiered in San Francisco in 2004 followed by productions in Boston, Buffalo, Los Angeles, Detroit, Louisville and the United Kingdom. The Broadway production opened on November 23, 2008 at the Marquis Theater and ran for 53 performances earning two Tony Award nominations. The musical was revived at the Marquis Theater for the 2009 Christmas season. White Christmas is a story of philanthropy and hope, a story of friends who use their talents to assist a friend in need. In the story, the four main characters, Bob Wallace, Phil Davis, Betty Haynes and Judy Haynes take the train from Florida to Vermont. All four characters are professional performers. Bob Wallace and Phil Davis are also war veterans who fought together during World War Two. Betty and Judy Haynes are sisters who perform together every winter at The Columbia Inn in Vermont. Bob and Phil accompany Betty and Judy to Vermont. When they arrive at The Columbia Inn Bob and Phil discover the inn is owned by General Henry Waverly, the general they served under during World War II. They also learn that the inn is on the verge of bankruptcy, due to lack of customers and snow. Bob Wallace, Phil Davis, Betty Haynes and Judy Haynes decide to use their singing and dancing talents to produce a show that will raise money for the financially struggling inn. Additionally, Bob and Phil reach out to all General Waverly’s former troops to invite them to support the general and attend the show. The Background section of this Companion includes information on Irving Berlin’s inspiration for the song White Christmas, information on the film and the musical theater production of the same name, and information on a special exhibit on Bob Hope currently on display in The National World War II Museum located in New Orleans. Bing Crosby and Bob Hope performed frequently together. Although Bob Hope was never considered for a role in White Christmas, he and Bing Crosby are both mentioned in the lyrics of one of the songs in the show. The song “Gee, I Wish I Was Back In The Army\" contains the lyric, \"Jolson, Hope And Benny all for free\". This is a reference to the three wartime entertainers: Al Jolson, Bob Hope and Jack Benny. The original words were \"Crosby, Hope and Jolson all for free\", but the lyric was changed because with Bing Crosby in the cast of White Christmas the original lyric would break the fourth wall. Bob Hope is included in this Companion for his long-time collaboration with White Christmas cast member Bing Crosby, his involvement in WWII and for his philanthropic efforts directly related to WWII. A Penny War is a friendly competition and a way everyone can get involved in philanthropy. In White Christmas: The Season of Giving, students will explore the story of White Christmas and its themes of giving, philanthropy and hope. During this exploration they will discuss the story and its connection to philanthropy. They will use this exploration to undertake their own philanthropic project (a Penny War,) engage at least one other class in the project, and explore mathematical concepts of >, =, and < and graphing (bar graphs, circle graphs, box-and-whisker plots and scatterplots.) They will use this exploration of mathematical concepts to compare and contrast the progress of the two classes throughout the course of the Penny War. AND they will use the proceeds they raise during their philanthropic project support a cause of their choosing. In the story White Christmas snow is a contributing factor to the Columbia Inn’s financial difficulties because it is ubiquitous. It impedes travel and prevents customers from visiting the Inn. As ubiquitous as the lace of snowflakes that cover the Vermont countryside for a good portion of the year, the lacy ironwork designs that decorate the doorways, balconies and staircases across New Orleans and many of the surrounding parishes are ubiquitous. In addition, the lace of snowflakes and the lacy ironwork designs have something in common: geometry and geometric patterns. In Symmetry: Lace and Snow students will learn how temperature is a factor in the development of the designs of snowflakes, investigate the germ of ice crystals (the hexagon,) discover the geometric patterns found in snowflakes, have the opportunity to further explore geometric patterns in three types of snowflakes: plane crystals, rimed snow crystals and irregular particles, compare and contrast these three types of snowflakes to five Adinkra symbols: twin crocodiles, spider’s web, fern, the “king of Adinkra symbols” and the staff of life and create their own lace designs inspired by these explorations. To further connect their investigations and discoveries students will develop written descriptions of the lace designs they create. To develop their writing, students will use an order of adjectives/list of adjectives review sheet as an additional source of inspiration. AN EXTENTION: Symmetry: Lace and Snow is a follow up to the designs students created using the White Christmas Symmetry: Lace and Snow graph paper. Students will investigate geometric patterns further by expressing designs as a sequence of numbers.

Subjects:

  • Arts > Drama/Dramatics
  • Language Arts > General
  • Language Arts > Grammar, Usage & Mechanics
  • Language Arts > Listening & Speaking
  • Language Arts > Literature
  • Language Arts > Reading Comprehension
  • Language Arts > Research
  • Education > StandardsAlignment
  • Arts > Visual Arts
  • Language Arts > Vocabulary
  • Language Arts > Writing

Education Levels:

  • Grade 1
  • Grade 2
  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5
  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10

Keywords:

Penny Wars, bar graphs, >, =, and <, circle graphs, box-and-whisker plots, scatterplots, setting, inference, geometry (symmetry: reflection, rotational and point) and geometric patterns, Adinkra symbols, number sequence, philanthropy, WWII, The National World War II Museum, Irving Berlin, David Ives, Paul Blake, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Update Standards?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.3: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.2: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

CCSS.Math.Content.K.NBT.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.B.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and

CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.B.5: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.B.6: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference.

CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.B.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.B.4: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots.

CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.

CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.

CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.6: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes.

CCSS.Math.Content.5.G.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Represent real world and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane, and interpret coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.

CCSS.Math.Content.7.G.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Draw (freehand, with ruler and protractor, and with technology) geometric shapes with given conditions. Focus on constructing triangles from three measures of angles or sides, noticing when the conditions determine a unique triangle, more than one triangle, or no triangle.
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Janet Pinto
February 26, 2019
, =, and < and graphing (bar graphs, circle graphs, box-and-whisker plots and scatterplots.) They will use this exploration of mathematical concepts to compare and contrast the progress of the two classes throughout the course of the Penny War. AND they will use the proceeds they raise during their philanthropic project support a cause of their choosing. In the story White Christmas snow is a contributing factor to the Columbia Inn’s financial difficulties because it is ubiquitous. It impedes travel and prevents customers from visiting the Inn. As ubiquitous as the lace of snowflakes that cover the Vermont countryside for a good portion of the year, the lacy ironwork designs that decorate the doorways, balconies and staircases across New Orleans and many of the surrounding parishes are ubiquitous. In addition, the lace of snowflakes and the lacy ironwork designs have something in common: geometry and geometric patterns. In Symmetry: Lace and Snow students will learn how temperature is a factor in the development of the designs of snowflakes, investigate the germ of ice crystals (the hexagon,) discover the geometric patterns found in snowflakes, have the opportunity to further explore geometric patterns in three types of snowflakes: plane crystals, rimed snow crystals and irregular particles, compare and contrast these three types of snowflakes to five Adinkra symbols: twin crocodiles, spider’s web, fern, the “king of Adinkra symbols” and the staff of life and create their own lace designs inspired by these explorations. To further connect their investigations and discoveries students will develop written descriptions of the lace designs they create. To develop their writing, students will use an order of adjectives/list of adjectives review sheet as an additional source of inspiration. AN EXTENTION: Symmetry: Lace and Snow is a follow up to the designs students created using the White Christmas Symmetry: Lace and Snow graph paper. Students will investigate geometric patterns further by expressing designs as a sequence of numbers."/>

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