Type:

Graphic Organizer/Worksheet, Lesson Plan, Rubric, Vocabulary, Manual

Description:

Activities, worksheets, lessons and presentations for teaching the daily life and military of Ancient Rome.

Subjects:

  • Language Arts > General
  • Language Arts > Literature
  • Language Arts > Research
  • Social Studies > General
  • Social Studies > World History

Education Levels:

  • Grade 6
  • Grade 7
  • Grade 8
  • Grade 9
  • Grade 10

Keywords:

collections Rome Mediterranean Europe Italy history military culture life

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Public - Available to anyone

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Update Standards?

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:8.1: History and Social Science

Explaining differences between historic and present day objects in the United States and/or the world, evaluating how the use of the object and the object itself changed over time, (e.g., comparing modes of transportation used in past and present exploration in order to evaluate impact and the effects of those changes).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:8.2: History and Social Science

Describing ways that life in the United States and/or the world has both changed and stayed the same over time; and explaining why these changes have occurred (e.g., In what ways would the life of a teenager during the American Revolution be different from the life of a teenager today? What factors have contributed to these differences?).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:8.3: History and Social Science

Investigating how events, people, and ideas have shaped the United States and/or the world; and hypothesizing how different influences could have led to different consequences (e.g., How did the civil rights movement change the U.S., and how might the U.S. be different if it had never happened?).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:9.1: History and Social Science

Identifying different types of primary and secondary sources, and understanding the benefits and limitations both bring to the study of history (e.g., interviews, biographies, magazine articles, and eyewitness accounts).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:9.2: History and Social Science

Reading and interpreting historic maps.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:9.3: History and Social Science

Identifying multiple perspectives in historic and current events (e.g., How might one of Santa Anna's soldiers describe the events at the Alamo? How might an American soldier describe the same events?).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:9.4: History and Social Science

Identifying attitudes, values, and behaviors of people in different historical contexts (e.g., What values justified denying women the vote?).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:9.5: History and Social Science

Identifying how technology can lead to a different interpretation of history (e.g., archeological excavation, using online primary source documents).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:10.1: History and Social Science

Identifying the beginning, middle, and end of an historical narrative or story.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:10.2: History and Social Science

Constructing time lines of significant historical developments in the nation and world, designating appropriate equidistant intervals of time and recording events according to the order in which they occurred.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:10.3: History and Social Science

Interpreting data presented in time lines.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:10.4: History and Social Science

Measuring and calculating calendar time by years, decades, centuries, and millennia (e.g., How old are the great pyramids of Egypt?).

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:10.5: History and Social Science

Making predictions and/or decisions based on an understanding of the past and the present.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:10.6: History and Social Science

Identifying an important event in the United States and/or world, and describing multiple causes and effects of that event.

SOC.5-6.H&SS5-6:10.7: History and Social Science

Explaining transitions between eras that occurred over time (e.g., the end of the Colonial era) as well as those that occurred as a result of a pivotal event (e.g., September 11th, the writing of the Declaration of Independence).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:8.1: History and Social Science

Explaining differences between historic and present day objects in the United States and/or the world, evaluating how the use of the object and the object itself changed over time, (e.g., comparing modes of transportation used in past and present exploration in order to evaluate impact and the effects of those changes).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:8.2: History and Social Science

Describing ways that life in the United States and/or the world has both changed and stayed the same over time; and explaining why these changes have occurred (e.g., In what ways would the life of a teenager during the American Revolution be different from the life of a teenager today? What factors have contributed to these differences?).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:8.3: History and Social Science

Investigating and evaluating how events, people, and ideas (democracy, for example) have shaped the United States and the world, and hypothesizing how different influences could have led to different consequences (e.g., How did the ideals of Greek democracy impact the world? How has European colonialism influenced race relations in Africa?).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:9.1: History and Social Science

Identifying different types of primary and secondary sources (for example, visual, literary, and musical sources), and evaluating the possible biases expressed in them (e.g., analyzing Paul Revere's engraving of the Boston Massacre).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:9.2: History and Social Science

Reading and interpreting historic maps.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:9.3: History and Social Science

Evaluating the credibility of differing accounts of the same event(s) (e.g., account of the Revolutionary War from a colonist's perspective vs. British perspective; the bombing of Hiroshima from the perspective of a Japanese citizen vs. an American soldier).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:9.4: History and Social Science

Evaluating attitudes, values, and behaviors of people in different historical contexts (e.g., examining how religious values have influenced historic events).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:9.5: History and Social Science

Identifying how technology can lead to a different interpretation of history (e.g., DNA evidence, forensic analysis of a battle site).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.1: History and Social Science

Identifying the beginning, middle, and end of an historical narrative or story.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.2: History and Social Science

Constructing time lines of significant historical developments in the nation and world, designating appropriate equidistant intervals of time and recording events according to the order in which they occurred.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.3: History and Social Science

Interpreting data presented in time lines.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.4: History and Social Science

Measuring and calculating calendar time by days, weeks, months, years, decades, centuries, and millennia (e.g., How long ago did people first come to North America?).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.5: History and Social Science

Understanding a variety of calendars (e.g., Islamic, Jewish, Chinese) and reasons for their organizational structures (e.g., political, historic, religious).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.6: History and Social Science

Making predictions and/or decisions based on an understanding of the past and the present (e.g., after analyzing past events, determining what steps can impact the future).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.7: History and Social Science

Identifying important events in the United States and/or world, and describing multiple causes and effects of those events.

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.8: History and Social Science

Explaining transitions between eras that occurred over time (e.g. independence of African nations) as well as those that occurred as a result of a pivotal event (e.g., the invention of the automobile and the light bulb).

SOC.7-8.H&SS7-8:10.9: History and Social Science

Identifying why certain events are considered pivotal and how they cause us to reorder time (e.g., the explosion of the atom bomb and the beginning of the nuclear age; September 11, 2001).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:8.1: History and Social Science

Explaining historical origins of key ideas and concepts (e.g., Enlightenment, Manifest Destiny, religious and governmental philosophies) and how they are reinterpreted over time.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:8.2: History and Social Science

Assessing how lifestyles and values have undergone dramatic changes in the U.S. and world (e.g., comparing life in China under the early imperial dynasties to present -day life, and assessing the degree of similarity and difference).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:8.3: History and Social Science

Hypothesizing how critical events could have had different outcomes.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:8.4: History and Social Science

Predicting possible outcomes of current world events, and supporting these predictions.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:9.1: History and Social Science

Locating appropriate primary and secondary sources in order to find evidence to support his or her hypothesis.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:9.2: History and Social Science

Reading and interpreting historic maps, and evaluating bias in these maps (e.g., size of African on European-made maps).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:9.3: History and Social Science

Evaluating the credibility of differing accounts of the same event(s), and recognizing any existing bias in their own writing about historical events (e.g., comparing accounts of an event in history textbook written in the early 1900s to the same account described in a more recent history text).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:9.4: History and Social Science

Recognizing media bias in the interpretation of world events, past and present (e.g., World War II propaganda).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:9.5: History and Social Science

Using technology to interpret history (e.g., using technology to access and interpret historical data).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.1: History and Social Science

Creating a historical narrative.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.2: History and Social Science

Locating relevant data for constructing a time line, and constructing time lines of significant historical developments in the nation and world, designating appropriate equidistant intervals of time and recording events according to the order in which they occurred.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.3: History and Social Science

Identifying how different cultures organize time according to key historical events (e.g., independence days, commemoration of past).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.4: History and Social Science

Interpreting data presented in time lines.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.5: History and Social Science

Measuring and calculating calendar time by days, weeks, months, years, decades, centuries, and millennia.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.6: History and Social Science

Understanding a variety of calendars (e.g., Islamic, Jewish, Chinese) and reasons for their organizational structures (e.g., political, historic, religious).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.7: History and Social Science

Making predictions, decisions, or taking a public stand on a defensible position based on an understanding of the past and present.

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.8: History and Social Science

Explaining why certain key events remain the historic consciousness and others do not (e.g., the role of Pilgrims in 1628).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.9: History and Social Science

Explaining transitions between eras that occurred over time as well as those that occurred as a result of a pivotal event, and evaluating the effects of these transitions (e.g., What factors led to various democratic revolutions? What have been the long-term effects of these revolutions?).

SOC.9-12.H&SS9-12:10.10: History and Social Science

Identifying why certain events are considered pivotal and how they cause us to reorder time (e.g., Muhammad's call to prophecy, the collapse of the Soviet Union).
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