Type:

Unit

Description:

This Area unit is primarily intended for third graders and aligned to the Common Core Standards. This unit contains lessons and adaptations from Engage New York, Common Core Georgia Performance Standards (CCGPS), Marilyn Burns, Creative Teaching Press, Dale Seymour, as well as other educational resources. We have adapted, combined, and sequenced these lessons and activities to create a comprehensive unit on Area for grade 3. If you would like more information or background about these lessons/activities, please refer to these outside resources. 

Subjects:

  • Mathematics > General

Education Levels:

  • Grade 3
  • Grade 4
  • Grade 5

Keywords:

area perimeter array multiplication area model irregular area shapes common core math

Language:

English

Access Privileges:

Members

License Deed:

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial

Collections:

None
Update Standards?

CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.4: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.B.5: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.C.7: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.NBT.A.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10—90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.5a: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

A square with side length 1 unit, called "a unit square," is said to have "one square unit" of area, and can be used to measure area.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.5b: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square units.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.6: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units).

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.7a: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.7b: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.7c: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b + c is the sum of a × b and a × c. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.7d: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems.

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.D.8: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.

CCSS.Math.Content.2.G.A.1: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.

CCSS.Math.Content.2.G.A.2: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find the total number of them.

CCSS.Math.Content.2.G.A.3: Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.

MA.2.CCSS.Math.Content.2.G.A.1: Mathematics

Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.

MA.2.CCSS.Math.Content.2.G.A.2: Mathematics

Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find the total number of them.

MA.2.CCSS.Math.Content.2.G.A.3: Mathematics

Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.1: Mathematics

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.2: Mathematics

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3: Mathematics

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.4: Mathematics

Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.B.5: Mathematics

Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.C.7: Mathematics

Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.NBT.A.3: Mathematics

Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10?90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.5a: Mathematics

A square with side length 1 unit, called ?a unit square,? is said to have ?one square unit? of area, and can be used to measure area.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.5b: Mathematics

A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an area of n square units.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.6: Mathematics

Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units).

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.7a: Mathematics

Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.7b: Mathematics

Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.7c: Mathematics

Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b + c is the sum of a × b and a × c. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.C.7d: Mathematics

Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems.

MA.3.CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.D.8: Mathematics

Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.
Curriki Rating
On a scale of 0 to 3
3
On a scale of 0 to 3

This resource was reviewed using the Curriki Review rubric and received an overall Curriki Review System rating of 3, as of 2014-08-06.

Component Ratings:

Technical Completeness: 3
Content Accuracy: 3
Appropriate Pedagogy: 0

Reviewer Comments:

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